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Earth’s magnetic field alignment and climate change?

  1. Feb 12, 2019 at 2:46 PM #1
    The Earth’s magnetic field is slowly moving with respect to the Earth’s surface and to the Sun’s incoming radiation and solar wind direction. Does the tilting/moving of Earth’s magnetic field axis to the incoming solar wind direction change the protection on different points of the Earth’s surface?

    By the Magnetic field alignment moving can it influence climate change at different points on the Earth’s surface?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2019 at 4:06 PM #2

    russ_watters

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    There's no evidence of a correlation and no reason to think there should be.
     
  4. Feb 12, 2019 at 4:37 PM #3

    Vanadium 50

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    The periods don't even align. In the last 100M years, there has been one ice age and two interglacials - but about 200 reversals.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019 at 5:26 PM
  5. Feb 13, 2019 at 6:53 AM #4
    Ok, so if the magnetic north pole was facing the Sun it would give the same protection as the current alignment does now?
     
  6. Feb 13, 2019 at 7:10 AM #5

    russ_watters

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    No, but solar wind has nothing to do with global temperatures/warming.
     
  7. Feb 13, 2019 at 8:43 AM #6
    Do you know of any research done on magnetic field alignment and solar wind direction? I wonder what the bow shock would look like if the magnetic north pole was facing the sun and will the north/south pole funnel the solar wind?
    This wiki on solar wind says it's quite hot 80000k
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_wind
     
  8. Feb 13, 2019 at 10:18 AM #7

    russ_watters

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    Not offhand, but I'm sure some is out there if you look.
    Ok... You are aware that we have sent dozens of spacecraft beyond Earth's magnetic field, right? Do they [risk] burn up or freeze?
     
  9. Feb 13, 2019 at 10:41 AM #8
    Um, IIRC, there may be some subtle effects due to UV and cloud-seeding / lightning / sprites etc triggering by radiation.

    Given our magnetic poles are currently far, far away from sub-solar zone, the nearest, poor analogue would seem a 'Carrington Event' or equivalent, which have wild aurorae but no apparent climate impact, I gotta go with the comment above about lack of correlation between reversals and ice-ages...
     
  10. Feb 13, 2019 at 10:44 AM #9
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019 at 10:55 AM
  11. Feb 13, 2019 at 11:22 AM #10

    russ_watters

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    That paper is 40 pages long. Can you quote a relevant passage? After a quick skim I don't see any relevance to this discussion.
    The wiki is not wrong; the solar wind carries heat. But it is vanishingly thin, so it carries only a vanishingly small amount of heat. You could probably calculate, from information in the wiki article, how much heat in watts per square meter and compare it to sunlight.
     
  12. Feb 13, 2019 at 11:45 AM #11
  13. Feb 13, 2019 at 1:28 PM #12
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_wind
    "In near-Earth space, the slow solar wind is observed to have a velocity of 300–500 km/s, a temperature of 1.4–1.6×10^6 K and a composition that is a close match to the corona. By contrast, the fast solar wind has a typical velocity of 750 km/s, a temperature of 8×10^5 K and it nearly matches the composition of the Sun's photosphere."
     
  14. Feb 13, 2019 at 1:43 PM #13
    The solar wind is indeed really hot but the density is very very very low. The temperature is not the only parameter important in heat transfer, the number of particles is also an important criteria.

    To have an idea of the magnitude of the energy fluxes in the atmosphere, I suggest you these:
    https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/climatescience/energybalance/planetarytemperatures.html

    https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/2008BAMS2634.1
    (you can get this paper by searching its title on Google)
     
  15. Feb 13, 2019 at 6:46 PM #14

    Vanadium 50

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    @BeedS, are you arguing that the earth's magnetic field does affect climate change or are you arguing that it should?
     
  16. Feb 14, 2019 at 1:50 AM #15
    I dont know if Earths magnetic field can affect climate change. I'm trying to find out if there is any known correlation or if there is any possibility that it can contribute through magnetic field dynamics.
     
  17. Feb 14, 2019 at 2:00 AM #16

    fresh_42

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    This question
    has been answered more than once
    Thread closed.
     
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