Electric Field at Various Points Between Two Charged Rods

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving the calculation of electrical field at different points between a positively and negatively charged rod. The positions 1 and 3 were found to be the same, but the field at position 2 was less than expected, which seemed counterintuitive. The person is asking if they made a mistake in their calculation and provides the standard formula for electric field between two charged rods. They are seeking an answer to their question.
  • #1
Bogus_Roads
33
0

Homework Statement


Two questions:

One problem asked me to calculate the Electrical Field at points 1 (1cm from the + rod),2 (2 cm from the positive rod), and 3 (3 cm from the positive rod) between a +10 nC rod and a -10 nC rod (in the middle in the vertical direction). I found that positions 1 and 3 were the same, which was whatki I expected, but I thought it was weird that the field in the very center (the rods are 4 cm apart), so at 2 cm from the positively charged rod, the field was LESS than in the other two positions. This seemed counterintuitive. Did I make a mistake?



Homework Equations



Erod=1/(4pi[tex]\epsilon[/tex]0))*[tex]\left|Q\right|[/tex]/(d*(d2+(L/2)1/2)




The Attempt at a Solution

 
Last edited:
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  • #2
(Epsilon shouldn't be an exponent)
 
  • #3
I'm having trouble putting the correct formula in on my smartphone, so I just mean the standard formula for electricnfield between two charged rods. Can someone please answer?
 

1. What is an electric field?

An electric field is a physical quantity that describes the strength and direction of the force that a charged particle experiences in the presence of other charged particles.

2. How is the electric field calculated between two charged rods?

The electric field between two charged rods can be calculated using the formula E = k*q/r, where E is the electric field, k is the Coulomb's constant, q is the charge on the rod, and r is the distance between the two rods.

3. What factors affect the strength of the electric field between two charged rods?

The strength of the electric field between two charged rods is affected by the magnitude of the charges on the rods, the distance between the rods, and the medium in which the rods are placed.

4. How does the direction of the electric field change between two charged rods?

The direction of the electric field between two charged rods depends on the relative charges of the rods. If the rods have the same charge, the electric field will point away from both rods. If the rods have opposite charges, the electric field will point towards the rods.

5. What happens to the electric field as you move closer or further away from the charged rods?

The electric field between two charged rods follows an inverse square law, meaning that as you move closer to the rods, the electric field becomes stronger and as you move further away, the electric field becomes weaker.

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