Electric field in a spherical shell

  • #1
curiosissimo
10
5
Homework Statement:
We have a spherical shell with 2 radiuses $$R_1<R_2$$ The charge Q is distributed uniformly in the part of the sphere between R1 and R2. The inner space of the sphere ($$0<y<R_1$$) has no charge What is the electric field in the spherical shell?
Relevant Equations:
Gaussian theorem
So for the Gaussian theorem we know that $$ \frac{Q}{e} = \vec E \cdot \vec S $$ Q's value is known so we don't need to express it as $$Q=(4/3)\pi*(R_2 ^3-R_1 ^3)*d$$ where d is the density of the charge in the volume. I've expressed the surface $$S=4\pi*x^2$$ where x is the distance of a point in the shell from the center of the sphere. So we simply get $$E=\frac{Q}{e*4\pi*x^2}$$ but it's wrong and I really don't know why. Thanks in advance!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
TSny
Homework Helper
Gold Member
13,843
4,020
Hello, curiosissimo. Welcome to PF.

Don't confuse the total charge of the shell with the charge enclosed by the Gaussian surface.
 
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  • #3
curiosissimo
10
5
Hello, curiosissimo. Welcome to PF.

Don't confuse the total charge of the shell with the charge enclosed by the Gaussian surface.
Of course! What a silly mistake! Thank you very much!
 

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