Electric field of a magnetic monopole

  • Thread starter arul_k
  • Start date
  • #1
95
1
A north magnetic monopole moving with uniform velocity through a uniform electric field would experience a force (assume the direction of the force to be upward along the x-axis) due to the circular electric field created around it. Similarly a south magnetic monopole would experience a force (opposite to that experienced by the N monopole) when moving through a electric field.

If we were to combine the N and S monopoles to form a dipole, the magnetic dipole would also experience a force similar to the force experienced by the monopoles.

My question is how is it that for the magnetic dipole the 2 opposing electric fields (caused by the N and S monopole) do not cancel each other such that no force is experienced by the magnetic dipole, which would be similar to the behaviour of an electric dipole which does not experience any force while moving through a magnetic field.
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
95
1
Any answers / suggestions would be most welcome....
 
  • #3
Khashishi
Science Advisor
2,815
493
If you allow for magnetic monopoles, the electric and magnetic forces are completely analogous. A dipole wouldn't feel a net force but it would feel some torque.
 
  • Like
Likes 1 person
  • #4
95
1
If you allow for magnetic monopoles, the electric and magnetic forces are completely analogous. A dipole wouldn't feel a net force but it would feel some torque.
Thanks Khashishi of your reply and sorry I didn't respon earlier. In actuality a dipole magnet does feel a net force, implying that electric and magneic forces are not completely analogous
 
  • #5
30,150
6,616
In actuality a dipole magnet does feel a net force
No, it doesn't. A dipole magnet does not feel a net force when moving through a uniform electric field.
 
  • #6
95
1
No, it doesn't. A dipole magnet does not feel a net force when moving through a uniform electric field.
Why is there no net force experienced by the dipole magnet?

I was under the impression that a dipole magnet moving with uniform velocity (assume it to be a bar magnet and the direction of motion being along its polar axis) would have a uniform electric field (the direction of the field would also be uniform) along its length surrounding it, and would thus feel a net force when moving through an electric field.
 
  • #7
Khashishi
Science Advisor
2,815
493
Because in a dipole, the forces on the north and south end cancel out.
 
  • #8
30,150
6,616
I was under the impression that a dipole magnet moving with uniform velocity (assume it to be a bar magnet and the direction of motion being along its polar axis) would have a uniform electric field (the direction of the field would also be uniform) along its length surrounding it, and would thus feel a net force when moving through an electric field.
The electric field produced by a moving magnetic dipole would be non-uniform. As Khashishi said, the total force would cancel out.
 

Related Threads on Electric field of a magnetic monopole

Replies
1
Views
482
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
21
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
581
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
704
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
2K
Top