Defining the Forces from Magnetic Fields and Electric Fields

In summary, the conversation discusses the definition of Electric Field Intensity vector and whether the same approach can be used for defining B vector as Magnetic Field Intensity vector. It also mentions the use of Coulomb's Law for magnetism in deriving the expression for magnetic field, which may be problematic if described as the Biot-Savart Law.
  • #1
We define Electric Field Intensity vector at a point as the force experienced by a unit positive charge kept at a point. Is it correct to define B vector similarly that is, is B vector the magnetic force acting on an unit magnetic north pole and is it correct to call B vector Magnetic Field Intensity vector?
 
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  • #2
There is no such thing as a unit magnetic north pole or magnetic monopoles in general for that matter.
 
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  • #3
Thank you for the response.
In a couple of textbooks I have gone through, to calculate magnetic field at any point on the axial line and equatorial line of a bar magnet of giver pole strength, the derivation for the expression of magnetic field is done by calculating the force acting on unit north mono pole kept at the given point and in the process, Coulomb's Law for magnetism is used. Is this approach wrong and is B vector ever called magnetic field intensity vector?
 
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  • #4
If they describe the Biot-Savart Law as "Coulomb's Law for magnetism", that is a problem, yes.
 
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  • #5
Welcome to PF.

physics_nsrg said:
In a couple of textbooks I have gone through
Which textbooks?
 
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