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Electric/Magnetic field Inverse square

  1. May 11, 2017 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Using magnetic field over electric field

    2. Relevant equations
    no equation needed

    3. The attempt at a solution
    THis may not make sense but did an experiment dealing with the inverse square law and we measured the magnetic field in this case. Want to know is there some type of difference between magnetic field and electric field where we would choose to use the magnetic field over the electric field? for the inverse square law?

    [Note: Thread moved to general physics by a mentor]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 11, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. May 11, 2017 #2

    andrevdh

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    the inverse square law depends on the configuration of the source(s) of the field, only if there is one magnet or a concentrated charge will it hold up
     
  4. May 11, 2017 #3
    Well we used 2 magnets but my teacher said we could perform the same experiment with just 2 charges and why were we not offered to use an electric fied than magnetic field in this case
     
  5. May 11, 2017 #4

    andrevdh

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    electric charges are difficult to keep control over. they can easily leak away for instance if you come too close to the source spark over can occur. also if the humidity is high (as low as 60% relative humidity) even an insulator can conduct the charge away thereby weakening the source. magnets are quite stable and do not change that readily, so it is much easier to work with them rather than an electrically charged body.
     
  6. May 11, 2017 #5

    Orodruin

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    Only the monopole field follows the inverse square law. There are no magnetic monopoles so the magnetic field does not follow the inverse square law.
     
  7. May 12, 2017 #6

    andrevdh

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    could you maybe show us your results or a picture of your graph?
     
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