Electrical Engineering or Physics major?

In summary, the conversation discusses the employability of a physics degree compared to an electrical engineering degree. The speaker shares their experience of switching from a physics undergraduate degree to an electrical engineering master's degree and then to neurophysics. They mention that while EE may have more job opportunities in their field, a physics degree is versatile in other industries and can lead to further education opportunities. However, if the goal is immediate employment, engineering may be the better choice.
  • #1
MathGangsta
30
0
Which degree is more employable? Anyone ever change from Physics to EE and not be disappointed? I'm just scared to major in Physics because I've never seen a job posting that says "Physics Bachelor's required." So it's a bit scary. Thanks.
 
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  • #2
I got my undergrad degree in physics and switched to EE for my master's. I've since switched
to neurophysics. I was somewhat disappointed with the whole philosophy behind engineering after having been trained from a scientific philosophy. Anyhow, I still like physics, I still work in physics while I pursue other education goals.

EE has probably has more job availability than physics when it comes to working in your field, but a physics degree is pretty versatile for if you want to work outside your field. For instance, think of how many managerial positions in any number of industries you could get into simply by putting physics degree on your resume. You can go into medicine, engineering, or even business after a physics degree if you wish to continue your education. Or you can teach, of course.
 
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  • #3
This is just based on what I know of my old friends from undergrad and what they did after graduation. If you are not planning on going to graduate or professional school, then EE is definitely more employable. With an EE degree you are immediately eligible to apply to engineering jobs. Whereas if you have a physics degree, engineering firms will wonder why they should hire you when they can just hire an engineer. As Pythagorean said, a physics degree is ultimately very versatile, if you wish to continue your education. I think physics does a better job of teaching you how to think and solve problems, but unfortunately this isn't a tangible thing that you can list on your resume.

Honestly if all you're interested in is employment (which is by no means an ignoble goal, especially in this economy), personally I'd go with engineering.
 

Related to Electrical Engineering or Physics major?

1. What is the difference between an Electrical Engineering major and a Physics major?

An Electrical Engineering major focuses on the practical application of electricity and electronics in various systems, such as power generation, telecommunications, and computer hardware. A Physics major, on the other hand, focuses on the theoretical aspects of electricity, magnetism, and other fundamental concepts in the field of physics.

2. What kind of job opportunities are available for graduates with an Electrical Engineering or Physics major?

Both majors offer a wide range of career opportunities in fields such as telecommunications, renewable energy, aerospace, research and development, and many more. Graduates with an Electrical Engineering major may also pursue careers in software engineering, while those with a Physics major may choose to work in fields such as medical physics or data science.

3. Is an Electrical Engineering or Physics major more challenging?

Both majors require a strong foundation in math and science, so they can be equally challenging. However, an Electrical Engineering major may require more hands-on laboratory work and practical applications, while a Physics major may involve more theoretical and mathematical concepts.

4. Can I switch from an Electrical Engineering major to a Physics major (or vice versa) during my studies?

It is possible to switch majors, but it may involve taking additional courses and potentially adding more time to your studies. It is recommended to carefully evaluate your interests and goals before committing to a major to avoid any delays in graduation.

5. What skills and qualities are important for success in an Electrical Engineering or Physics major?

Strong analytical and problem-solving skills, attention to detail, and a passion for math and science are important qualities for success in both majors. Additionally, good communication and teamwork skills are crucial for collaborating on projects and presenting research findings.

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