Electrical field lines in conductive wire

In summary, when connecting a voltage to the heads of a conductive wire, the field lines inside the wire will be parallel and uniform due to the wire's resistance. In the case of dc currents, the current is the same in every wire and the electric field lines are parallel to the wires. However, for high ac frequencies, the currents flow only on the outside of the wires in a thin layer due to skin depth. In the case of extreme conductors, such as superconductors, the currents only run on the surface and there is no electrical or magnetic field deep inside the wire. A seven-conductor wire design is a good compact option, with the current and electric field being constant throughout the wire.
  • #1
Hi

we connect a Voltage to heads of a conductive wire
how will be the field lines inside Wire ? (cylinder wire)

E = [tex]\rho[/tex] J

so ? :D

field lines are parrarell inside wire ?

in whole wire Electrical field is constant ?
(J must be more in center of wire)

what about Extreme Conductors ? ( i don't know the word in Eng , those with 0 Resistance)
 
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  • #2
If the current is constant it is a good approximation to assume, that the current and the electric field are the same everywhere and in parallel to the wire. Superconductors have currents only running on the surface, and there cannot be an electrical or magnetical field deep inside.
 
  • #3
Seven-conductor wire (6 + 1 conductors) is a good compact design. For dc currents, the current is the same in every wire. The electric field lines are uniform and parallel to the wires, and are due to the wire resistance (div D = p). At high ac frequencies the currents flow in a thin layer (skin depth) on the outside of the wires.
 

1. What are electrical field lines in conductive wire?

Electrical field lines in conductive wire are imaginary lines that represent the direction and strength of the electric field around a wire. They show the path that a positive charge would take if placed in the electric field.

2. How are electrical field lines in conductive wire formed?

Electrical field lines in conductive wire are formed due to the flow of electric current through the wire. The current creates a magnetic field around the wire, which in turn creates an electric field. The field lines are then drawn perpendicular to the wire, with the direction of the lines indicating the direction of the electric field.

3. How do electrical field lines in conductive wire affect the flow of electricity?

The presence of electrical field lines in conductive wire affects the flow of electricity by providing a path for the current to flow. The field lines guide the flow of electrons, ensuring that the current flows smoothly and efficiently through the wire.

4. Can the number of electrical field lines in conductive wire change?

Yes, the number of electrical field lines in conductive wire can change. The number of field lines increases as the strength of the electric field increases, and decreases as the field weakens. Additionally, the number of field lines can also change depending on the shape and position of the wire.

5. How can we use electrical field lines in conductive wire in practical applications?

Electrical field lines in conductive wire have many practical applications. They are used in electrical circuits to guide the flow of electricity and prevent short circuits. They are also used in electrical motors and generators to create a magnetic field that can convert electrical energy into mechanical energy and vice versa.

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