Electrocuted by household static…?

  • Thread starter rpellerin87
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In summary: Some people are also sensitive to static electricity and may benefit from using an anti-static wristband or clothing.
  • #1
rpellerin87
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Electrocuted...by household static…?

Hi, lately I find that I have been getting shocked by pretty much anything electronic and it has been getting stronger. Lately it’s seems like I can’t even turn off the light switch without getting a shock, on average I seem to shock myself about 100-150 times a day. It’s usually nothing to complain about but on larger power sources it’s stronger and sometimes painful. For instance when I close my laptop, the shock is so strong that sometimes whichever finger touches the laptop first goes numb for about an hour. Worst part is I think it is still getting worse. Just the other day the light on my desk lamp blew when I accidentally brushed part of it with my finger and was shocked.

So I guess my question is…what the heck is going on here? I really don’t care for having to constantly replace light bulbs and have parts of my hand numb for hours.
Any suggestions on how to stop this? Or at least from getting any worse?
Thanks!
 
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  • #2
Rubber shoes, carpeting, winter.
 
  • #3
If the lamp (an inanimate object not subject to changes in sensitivity and immune to small static charges) blew, you have either a coincidence or a faulty lamp. Use a voltmeter to check the voltage of the lamp housing with respect to ground.
 
  • #4
Yeah, definitely check the lamp; that could be something dangerous.
As for the rest, all that I can think of is to spray a lot of Static Guard or similar product all over your carpets, furniture, and clothing. Also try to wear materials that are less likely to build up a charge, and don't shuffle your feet when you walk.
 
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  • #5
I bet Russ and Danger have it. OP, have you recently bought a pair of Crocs (or the ripoffs)? Is it cold right now where you live?
 
  • #6
Along with your choice of clothing and shoes.
If the weather report in your area is for low humidity then a ruining a humidifier in your home will help a lot.
The temperature may not matter, but if it's hot you tend to perspire which will help alleviate the problem.
 
  • #7
First off, get an outlet tester and test all the outlets in your place to make certain that all circuits are properly grounded. If you've got some appliances that are not properly grounded and you get a static-electricity shock when touching them, the voltage differential between the appliance and ground can piggyback on that spark and you become the path to ground.
 
  • #8
A humidifier would help reduce normal static shock.
 

Related to Electrocuted by household static…?

1. What is household static electricity and how does it work?

Household static electricity is a buildup of electric charge on the surface of an object, caused by the transfer of electrons between two objects. It occurs when two objects that are not good conductors of electricity rub against each other, causing one object to lose electrons and become positively charged, while the other gains electrons and becomes negatively charged. This imbalance of charges creates a static electricity charge.

2. Can you be electrocuted by household static electricity?

While household static electricity can give you a mild shock, it is highly unlikely to cause electrocution. The amount of charge buildup is usually not enough to cause serious harm. However, it is always important to be cautious around household appliances and electronics, as they can have high voltages and may cause electric shocks.

3. What are some common ways to get electrocuted by household static electricity?

The most common way to get a shock from household static electricity is by touching a metal object after walking on a carpeted floor. This is because carpets are good insulators, which can cause a buildup of static charge on your body. Other common sources of static electricity in the household include clothing, furniture, and electronics.

4. How can I protect myself from being electrocuted by household static electricity?

To reduce the risk of getting a shock from household static electricity, you can take some precautions such as wearing natural fabrics, using a humidifier to add moisture to the air, and using anti-static products on carpets and furniture. You can also discharge any built-up static charge by touching a grounded object before touching a metal object.

5. Is there a difference between household static electricity and electric shock from a power outlet?

Yes, there is a significant difference. Household static electricity is a buildup of charge on the surface of an object, while an electric shock from a power outlet is a direct contact with a high voltage current. Household static electricity can give you a mild shock, while an electric shock from a power outlet can be more dangerous and potentially life-threatening. It is important to take precautions and use safety measures when dealing with electricity from power outlets.

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