Electromagnet and a current carrying wire

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of an electromagnet, which is a material with low susceptibility and high permeability that can generate a magnetic field when an electric current is applied. The magnetic field is created by the alignment of electron spins in the material. The conversation then poses the question of whether a hypothetical wire with a vacuum-filled core and a shell that prevents electrons from escaping could also generate a magnetic field if wrapped around a material with high permeability. It is concluded that there is essentially no difference between this wire and a regular wire in terms of generating a magnetic field. The conversation also mentions the education level of the person asking the question and how the thread has been changed to ensure a more helpful response.
  • #1
Hami Hashmi
40
1
Hi,
My understanding of an electromagnet is that it is a material with low susceptibility and high permeability, i.e. the magnetic field is not permanent but in the application of a current then the material gets a large magnetic field. In the application of a current the spins of the electrons in the material align in the same direction so the material gets a net "magnetic moment" or magnetic field. I have read on Wikipedia that the magnetic core "focuses" the field caused by the current so the field strength increases by thousands of times. I also know that the current is caused by an electric field drawing the loose valance electrons forward to make a flow of electricity. So my question is this: if you had a hypothetical wire that had in its interior a vacuum, and a shell that no electrons could escape from, could this wire, if wrapped around a material with
high permeability, generate a magnetic field? I am not sure if the electrons have to escape the wire and go into the magnetic core for the material to get a magnetic field.
 
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  • #2
Hami Hashmi said:
So my question is this: if you had a hypothetical wire that had in its interior a vacuum, and a shell that no electrons could escape from, could this wire,

What do you mean by this ??

Hami Hashmi said:
I am not sure if the electrons have to escape the wire and go into the magnetic core for the material to get a magnetic field.

of course not ... that doesn't happen in a normal electro-magnet
Also the wire of the coil is insulated otherwise the turns of the coil would short circuit
 
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  • #3
Hami Hashmi said:
if you had a hypothetical wire that had in its interior a vacuum, and a shell that no electrons could escape from, could this wire, if wrapped around a material with
high permeability, generate a magnetic field?

Do you mean a wire with a vacuum-filled hollow core, like a hollow cylinder? There is essentially no difference between that and a regular wire.
 
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  • #4
Yea that's what I mean.
 
  • #5
Hami Hashmi said:
Thanks that was the answer i was looking for speaking of my education level I have not studied maxwell's equations yet but I put it as intermediate because i thought that someone with that education level could answer my question.

No, it refers to the type of answer you get. An I answer is likely mathematical. A B answer is mostly in words. I'm going to change this thread to B for you and I cleaned up the posts. Hopefully that might get some good answers for you.
 
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Related to Electromagnet and a current carrying wire

1. What is an electromagnet?

An electromagnet is a type of magnet that is created by passing an electric current through a wire. It consists of a wire wrapped around a metal core, such as iron, and when the current flows through the wire, it creates a magnetic field around the core.

2. How is an electromagnet different from a permanent magnet?

An electromagnet is different from a permanent magnet because it can be turned on and off by controlling the flow of electric current. A permanent magnet, on the other hand, always has a magnetic field and does not require an external power source.

3. How does a current carrying wire create a magnetic field?

When an electric current flows through a wire, it creates a circular magnetic field around the wire. The strength of the magnetic field depends on the amount of current flowing through the wire and the distance from the wire.

4. What is the relationship between the strength of the magnetic field and the current in a wire?

The strength of the magnetic field is directly proportional to the amount of current flowing through the wire. This means that as the current increases, the magnetic field also increases.

5. What are some real-world applications of electromagnets and current carrying wires?

Electromagnets and current carrying wires have many practical applications, such as in electric motors, generators, MRI machines, and speakers. They are also used in everyday devices like doorbells, credit card readers, and computer hard drives.

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