Electromagnetism - Linear charge

In summary, the problem involves calculating the length from position 1 to position 2 in an infinite line charge scenario with a charged rectangle and a charged line segment. The equations used include E=(1/4πε)*(q/r), ΔV=∫E*dr=(1/4πε)*q∫(1/r)=(1/4πε)*q*ln (r2/r1), ΔU=ΔK=mv^2/2, and ΔK=mv^2/2=ΔV*q=q*(1/4πε)*Q*(ln(r2/r1)). The final answer is correct if certain assumptions are made, such as v(L)=0 and Q being the
  • #1
Jon Blind
10
2

Homework Statement



cf48e17f857f9b75f951422f5b8d9171.png

q=1.602*10^-19 point 1

L=1mm=r1

v=1.1*10^6 at point 2

F=1.44*10^-12 at point 1

Homework Equations


E=(1/4πε)*(q/r)

ΔV=∫E*dr=(1/4πε)*q∫(1/r)=(1/4πε)*q*ln (r2/r1)

ΔU=ΔK=mv^2/2

ΔK=mv^2/2=ΔV*q=q*(1/4πε)*Q*(ln(r2/r1))

Q=F/E=1.44*10^-12/(q(4*pi*epsilon*(1.00*10^-3)^2))=1.00*10^-9

The Attempt at a Solution

mv^2/2=ΔV*q=q*(1/4πε)*Q*(ln(r2/r1))

r2=0.002m

IS this correct?
 
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  • #2
Your problem statement doesn't actually state a problem. What is to be analyzed or found?

What is the description of the scenario? Is that vertical charged rectangle meant to represent a short charged plate, part of in infinite plane of charge, a section through a disk of charge, or maybe just a short charged line segment? Something else?

Please provide a complete problem statement.
 
  • #3
Sorry but you have to calculate the length from position 1 to position 2. It's an infinite linecharge.

I can't understand where I went wrong in my calculations.
 
  • #4
It's correct assuming v(L) = 0 and Q = line charge linear density which is usually written as λ and which has dimensions of QL-1, not Q.

PS did not check math.
 

Related to Electromagnetism - Linear charge

1. What is linear charge?

Linear charge is a concept in electromagnetism that refers to the distribution of electrical charge along a one-dimensional line. It is often used to describe the charge distribution of a wire or rod.

2. How is linear charge different from point charge?

Linear charge is different from point charge in that it is spread out along a line, while point charge is concentrated at a single point. This means that linear charge has an infinite length while point charge has a finite size.

3. What is the relationship between linear charge and electric field?

Linear charge creates an electric field that is directly proportional to the amount of charge and inversely proportional to the distance from the line of charge. This relationship is described by Coulomb's law.

4. How does linear charge affect the behavior of charged particles?

Charged particles will experience a force when placed in the electric field created by linear charge. The direction and magnitude of this force depends on the charge of the particle and the direction and strength of the electric field.

5. Can linear charge be negative?

Yes, linear charge can be negative. This means that the charge is distributed along a line in such a way that the direction of the electric field is opposite to the direction of the charge. Positive and negative linear charges can cancel each other out and result in a net neutral charge.

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