Energy from the Big Bang

In summary, Gravitational energy is created when masses are closer together and has a negative energy which can be used up. The more tightly masses are bound, the more energy is created. When an explosion happens, the energy is released and can be seen as a bright light.
  • #1
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Why is the energy coming as a result of a Big Bang so explosive as to burst into universe(s)?

How can something coming from nothing have so much energy?

Why is it in physics, the smaller something is the more energy it has?

What is, in physics, the exact moment of an explosion?

Please
 
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  • #2
Unknown. But fun to speculate.
 
  • #3
Hi Shoshana!
Shoshana said:
Why is the energy coming as a result of a Big Bang so explosive as to burst into universe(s)?

How can something coming from nothing have so much energy?
Gravitational energy can be thought of as a negative form of energy, the more you use it the bigger it gets, like my overdraft. The total energy of the universe may well be zero, the positive energy of the matter universe being canceled out by the negative energy of the gravitational field and any Dark Energy lying around.
Why is it in physics, the smaller something is the more energy it has?
Because it is more tightly bound by that energy.
What is, in physics, the exact moment of an explosion?
I take it that you are referring to the 'explosion' of the BB?

It all depends on how you measure it.

You cannot speak of anything unless you have some way of experiencing that phenomenon. In physics we measure and compare observables with some definitive standard, a block of platinum in a Paris safe or a specific emission line of a particular caesium atom for example.

At the earliest moments of the BB there were no such atoms around to define mass, length or time and so these physical quantities have to be carefully extrapolated from regions where they do exist and can be measured, basically that means all the way back to planet Earth.

In order to extrapolate from here to there we have to assume and then define something to be constant over that distance. In GR it is energy-momentum that is conserved and the mass of an atom that is defined thereby to be constant. In so doing the energy of a photon is not conserved and so they show red shift when transmitted from 'there to here'. Defining a second by the 'tick' of an atomic clock one finds the universe appears to have a beginning at the BB, at least according to the standard theory of GR unadulterated by quantum effects. It is not only the beginning of the universe but also the beginning of time as there was no time, i.e. no means of measuring time, at t<0.

However if we take, for example, the frequency (inverse) of a photon as the 'tick' of our clock you find the BB is translated into the infinite past and there was no 'beginning'.

It depends on how you measure it.

Garth
 
  • #4
Garth said:
Gravitational energy can be thought of as a negative form of energy, the more you use it the bigger it gets, like my overdraft. The total energy of the universe may well be zero, the positive energy of the matter universe being canceled out by the negative energy of the gravitational field and any Dark Energy lying around.Because it is more tightly bound by that energy.

Attractive Gravity is a "curvature of space" which indicates the presence of energy.

You may be thinking that an "apple on a planet" has less energy than "apple
far off the planet" which is true for the pair of apple+planet. But the
gravity itself is the indiciation of the presence of positive energy density.
 

1. What is "Energy from the Big Bang"?

The Big Bang theory states that the universe was created through a massive explosion about 13.8 billion years ago. This explosion released an enormous amount of energy, which is known as "Energy from the Big Bang". It is the energy that formed the building blocks of the universe and continues to power its expansion.

2. Where did the energy from the Big Bang come from?

The energy from the Big Bang is believed to have originated from a singularity, a point of infinite density and temperature. As the singularity expanded, it released an immense amount of energy that filled the universe and continues to drive its expansion.

3. How is the energy from the Big Bang measured?

The energy from the Big Bang is measured in terms of temperature and radiation. The temperature of the universe shortly after the Big Bang was estimated to be around 10^32 Kelvin, which is incredibly high. Today, this energy can be detected through cosmic background radiation, which is the leftover heat from the Big Bang that permeates the entire universe.

4. Can we harness the energy from the Big Bang?

Currently, it is not possible to harness the energy from the Big Bang. The energy is spread out across the entire universe and is not concentrated enough to be harnessed. However, scientists are constantly studying the universe to understand its origins and potential for energy sources in the future.

5. Is the energy from the Big Bang infinite?

The energy from the Big Bang is not infinite. It was a one-time event that released an immense amount of energy, but it is not constantly producing new energy. However, the universe is constantly expanding, which means the energy from the Big Bang is spreading out and becoming less concentrated over time.

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