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B Energy imparted to an ion by a magnetic field

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  1. Feb 9, 2017 #1
    Basically my question is: if an anion is placed by the negative poll of a magnet will it push on the particle?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 9, 2017 #2
    Negative charges repel negative charges, and positive charges repel positive charges.
     
  4. Feb 9, 2017 #3
    Is there a calculation for the amount of kinetic energy imparted to the particle? Also where does the power come from, is the strength of the magnetic field reduced?
     
  5. Feb 9, 2017 #4
    Perhaps Coulomb's law? I'm no master of electromagnetism but it seems like the equation would apply in this case.
     
  6. Feb 9, 2017 #5
    Coulomb's law would give you the force, though, and not kinetic energy. You would have to use other equations to find the kinetic energy.
     
  7. Feb 9, 2017 #6

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    No. The poles of a magnet are not charged.
     
  8. Feb 9, 2017 #7
    If it is just a negative pole in general it would still repel the anion though, correct?
     
  9. Feb 9, 2017 #8

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    Magnets don't have negative poles. They have north and south poles.
     
  10. Feb 9, 2017 #9
    I don't know why I used poles in that. I just meant a negative charge.
     
  11. Feb 9, 2017 #10

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, an anion is negatively charged so it will be repelled from other negative charges. This has nothing to do with a magnet since magnets are typically uncharged.
     
  12. Feb 10, 2017 #11
    Going back to the original question, if you "place" a charge near the pole of a magnet, and if the word "place" means the charge is not moving when you place it, then, as Dale stated above, there is no force on the charge. If the charge has a velocity, there is a force on the charge depending on the direction of the velocity and the magnetic field.
     
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