Establish wheatstone bridge priciple by using kircchof's law

In summary, the Wheatstone Bridge principle is a fundamental concept in electrical circuitry that uses the concept of balancing opposing branches of a circuit to measure resistance. It consists of four resistors arranged in a diamond shape, with an unknown resistance in one branch, and is balanced using Kirchhoff's laws. This principle has various applications in science and engineering, but it also has limitations such as assuming perfect balance and only being applicable to DC circuits.
  • #1
pavel987
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How i can Establish wheatstone bridge principle by using kircchof's law?please tell me in details or send pdf or .doc files to:pavelavw@yahoo.com
 
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  • #2
Given that you're looking for the details, rather than help in deriving it, Google.com iwould be a better place to start than here.

You could search, for example, for "kirchhoff's Law Wheatstone Bridge" - I found loads...
 
  • #3


The Wheatstone bridge principle is a fundamental concept in electrical engineering and is used to measure unknown resistances. It is based on Kirchhoff's laws, which state that the sum of the currents entering a junction must be equal to the sum of the currents leaving the junction and the sum of the voltage drops in a closed loop must be equal to the sum of the voltage sources.

To establish the Wheatstone bridge principle using Kirchhoff's law, we can start by understanding the basic components of a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The Wheatstone bridge consists of four resistors, connected in a diamond shape, with a voltage source connected to two opposite points and the unknown resistance connected to the remaining two points. The goal of the Wheatstone bridge is to find the value of the unknown resistance by balancing the voltage drops across the two branches of the circuit.

Now, let's apply Kirchhoff's laws to this circuit. According to Kirchhoff's current law, the sum of the currents entering the junction at point A must be equal to the sum of the currents leaving the junction at point A. Since there are only two branches in the circuit, the current entering the junction must be equal to the current leaving the junction. This means that the current flowing through the unknown resistance is equal to the current flowing through the known resistors.

Next, we can apply Kirchhoff's voltage law to the closed loop formed by the Wheatstone bridge. According to this law, the sum of the voltage drops in a closed loop must be equal to the sum of the voltage sources. In our circuit, the voltage drops across the two known resistors must be equal to the voltage drop across the unknown resistor. This is because the voltage source is connected to the two opposite points of the diamond-shaped circuit, creating a balanced voltage drop.

By combining these two laws, we can establish the Wheatstone bridge principle. The principle states that when the two branches of a Wheatstone bridge are balanced, the ratio of the known resistances is equal to the ratio of the unknown resistance. This means that we can calculate the value of the unknown resistance by using the known resistances and the balanced voltage drop.

In summary, the Wheatstone bridge principle can be established by applying Kirchhoff's laws to the circuit and understanding the relationship between the known and unknown resistances. This principle is crucial in electrical engineering and is used in various applications, such as strain gauges, temperature sensors, and resistance measurement. I hope
 

Related to Establish wheatstone bridge priciple by using kircchof's law

1. What is the Wheatstone Bridge principle?

The Wheatstone Bridge principle is a fundamental concept in electrical circuitry that is used to measure resistance. It was first introduced by Sir Charles Wheatstone in the 19th century and is based on the concept of balancing two opposing branches of a circuit to determine an unknown resistance.

2. How does the Wheatstone Bridge principle work?

The Wheatstone Bridge consists of four resistors arranged in a diamond shape with an unknown resistance, R, in one of the branches. A voltage source is connected to the two opposite vertices of the diamond, and a galvanometer is connected to the other two vertices. By adjusting the known resistances, the bridge is balanced when there is no current flow through the galvanometer, and the unknown resistance can be determined using Kirchhoff's laws.

3. What is Kirchhoff's law and how is it used in the Wheatstone Bridge principle?

Kirchhoff's laws are two fundamental principles in circuit analysis that are used to calculate the voltage and current in a circuit. The first law, also known as Kirchhoff's current law, states that the sum of currents entering a node in a circuit is equal to the sum of currents leaving the node. The second law, Kirchhoff's voltage law, states that the sum of voltage drops in a closed loop is equal to the sum of the voltage sources in the loop. These laws are used to balance the Wheatstone Bridge and determine the unknown resistance.

4. What are the applications of the Wheatstone Bridge principle?

The Wheatstone Bridge principle has various applications in science and engineering, including the measurement of unknown resistance in electrical circuits, strain gauges for measuring mechanical stress, and thermistors for measuring temperature. It is also used in electronic devices such as voltmeters, ammeters, and potentiometers.

5. What are the limitations of the Wheatstone Bridge principle?

The Wheatstone Bridge principle assumes that the resistors in the bridge are perfectly balanced, and there is no current leakage. In reality, this is not always the case, and small errors may occur in the measurement. Additionally, the Wheatstone Bridge is only applicable to DC circuits and cannot be used for AC circuits. It also requires an accurate measurement of voltage and current, which may be challenging to obtain in some cases.

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