Estimate for the change in range for a proton

In summary, the conversation is about a past paper question on the subject of radiation protection. The person is asking for help with understanding the equations R ∝ 1/p and R ∝ M/z2, and whether a formula found online is correct. They provide a screenshot of their lecture notes and a link to a website for context. They also share their attempt at the question, including values from a graph for the proton range versus energy of photon, and calculations for the change in R.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



I've uploaded the question in the attached file.

Homework Equations



R ∝ 1/p
R ∝ M/z2

The Attempt at a Solution



I don't understand what is in my lecture notes. What equations do I need to attempt this question? Thank you.
 

Attachments

  • Change in R of proton.jpg
    Change in R of proton.jpg
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  • #2
tastytau said:
I don't understand what is in my lecture notes. What equations do I need to attempt this question?

We can't give any assistance unless you can show us some attempt at a solution. Also, just saying you don't understand what's in your lecture notes is way too vague. We need specifics about what equations or statements you don't understand. If your lecture notes or textbook are available online, please give a reference.
 
  • #3
As Peter has said, we can't help until we see your work.

We need to know some context too:

Is this a high school or college assignment? what class are you taking? what book are you using? ...
 
  • #4
Hi, I can't really put my lecture notes on here - they're too long to post and it would identify the university. I've taken a screenshot of the section of the notes where those equations are from. It's a past paper question on the subject of radiaton protection. I don't have a book so any guidance would be valuable.

https://image.ibb.co/eeJgXJ/notes.jpg

There is a formula on the following website, is this along the right lines?

http://www.kayelaby.npl.co.uk/atomic_and_nuclear_physics/4_5/4_5_1.html
 
Last edited:
  • #5
Attempt at the question:

R(B) = [M/Z2] Rp(B)

Propton range versus energy of photon values gained from this graph: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id...EIazAH#v=onepage&q=proton range g/cm2&f=false

1 MeV photon in Al = 0.01 g/cm2
1 MeV photon in Pb = 0.03 g/cm2

R(B) = 27/132 (0.01 g/cm2) = 1.598x10-3 g/cm2
R(B) = 208/822 (0.03 g/cm2) = 9.280x10-4 g/cm2

Change in R = 1.598x10-3 g/cm2 - 9.280x10-4 g/cm2 = 6.7x10-4 g/cm2
 
  • #6
Bump.
 

1. What is a proton?

A proton is a subatomic particle that has a positive electrical charge and is found in the nucleus of an atom. It is one of the building blocks of matter and is essential for the formation of atoms and molecules.

2. Why is it important to estimate the change in range for a proton?

Estimating the change in range for a proton is important in understanding the behavior and interactions of particles in various environments. It can also help in predicting the effects of high-energy particles on materials and living organisms.

3. How is the change in range for a proton calculated?

The change in range for a proton is calculated by using the energy and mass of the proton, as well as the properties of the medium it is traveling through. This can be done using mathematical equations and models.

4. What factors can affect the change in range for a proton?

The change in range for a proton can be affected by the energy of the proton, the properties of the medium it is traveling through (such as density and composition), and any interactions with other particles or fields.

5. How is the change in range for a proton related to its kinetic energy?

The change in range for a proton is directly related to its kinetic energy. As the proton loses energy, its range decreases and vice versa. This relationship can be described by the Bragg curve, which shows the energy loss of a particle as it travels through a medium.

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