Exploring Periods in a Pendulum Lab with Logger Pro

In summary, the conversation is about a lab involving a pendulum and the use of a program called Logger Pro to measure the period in different conditions. The question is why the program only reports the time between every other block of the photogate instead of every block. Possible explanations include the need to take into account both the initial position and velocity for the pendulum to complete a full cycle, and the use of a sine graph to measure the period.
  • #1
8parks11
63
0
I'm doing a Pedelum Periods lab to measure the period in different amplitude,length, and bob mass. There is a program called loggerpro that most people might know and some might not Anyways the photogate measures the period but the question is


1) Why is Logger Pro set up to report the time between every other blocking of the Photogate? why not the time between every block?


Please I need help in this one problem..
My first answer was random spread and my second guess was that it would be because every swing had the same constant period.

Can someone explain me the correct path (or answer?)
 
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  • #2
I'm not sure what exactly you're doing, but I think I can guess.

You have a pendulum swinging. At some point on its path, it blocks a light source, and a program records that this source has been blocked. You want to know why, in measuring the period, it only takes into account every other block.

The period is the time it takes for the pendulum to return to its starting conditions. This means both initial position, AND initial velocity (otherwise it hasn't begun to repeat its cycle yet). Take the pendulum by hand, and start moving it. You can see the first time it blocks the gate, the velocity is moving in the opposite direction
 
  • #3
I think that's pretty much correct. Thanks
 
  • #4
Another way of looking at the problem is that the oscillating motion creates a sine graph of displacement versus time. To obtain the period one need to measure the time between two points that have the same phase on the graph. This means measuring the time lapse between two points in the motion where the displacement and the direction of motion is the same. Since it is generally not possible to get the position of the photogate exactly at the equilibrium of the motion we take the elapsed time between crossings in the same direction, otherwise one would get a sort of half period (a little under or over) value.
 

Related to Exploring Periods in a Pendulum Lab with Logger Pro

1. What is a pendulum lab and what can it teach us?

A pendulum lab is an experiment that involves studying the motion and behavior of a pendulum. It can teach us about the principles of motion, such as gravity and inertia, and how these factors affect the movement of a pendulum.

2. How does Logger Pro help with exploring periods in a pendulum lab?

Logger Pro is a data collection and analysis software that can be used to record and analyze the motion of a pendulum. It can measure the time and distance of each swing, and calculate the period of the pendulum, making it easier to explore and understand the concept of periods.

3. What factors can affect the period of a pendulum?

The period of a pendulum can be affected by various factors, such as the length of the string, the mass of the pendulum, and the angle at which it is released. Other external factors, such as air resistance and friction, can also impact the period of a pendulum.

4. How can we use the data collected from a pendulum lab to make predictions?

By analyzing the data collected from a pendulum lab, we can determine the relationship between the length of the string and the period of the pendulum. This relationship can then be used to make predictions about the period of a pendulum with a different length or mass.

5. What are some real-world applications of understanding periods in a pendulum?

The concept of periods in a pendulum has many real-world applications, such as in clock mechanisms, seismology, and engineering. It is also used in sports, such as in the design of pendulum-like swings in golf clubs and tennis rackets, to achieve maximum performance.

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