Exploring the Electromagnetic Properties of Photons and Their Attraction

  • Thread starter ramanakumars
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Photons
In summary, the conversation revolves around the question of whether there is any electromagnetic property of photons that causes them to attract towards each other. One person believes the answer is no, while another mentions Feynman's NZ lectures where he discusses the possibility of photons being slightly closer together than their original positions. The conversation then delves into the concept of light paths and the probability of certain configurations. The conclusion is that while light can take any path, the most likely one is usually a straight line. A link is provided for further reading on the topic.
  • #1
ramanakumars
13
0
Is there any electromagnetic property of photons that make them attract towards each other?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
No.
Why do you think so?
 
  • #3
Just wondering if there was any connection with electromagnetic waves and bending with magnetic fields...
 
  • #4
I think the answer is yes, and it is mentioned in Feynman's NZ lectures. I don't think this is what you were thinking of, but it goes like this:
Time is up, space is horizontal, ignore the dots:
A . . B
| . . |
| . . |
| . . |
| . . |
a . . b
The probability that you will get photons at A and B a short time after them being at a and b is calculated using the two events shown. But there is also the possibility of this:
A . . B
. \. /
.. \/
.. /\
. /. \
a . . b
Which is less likely as it involves a larger distance for one thing.
But taking the two together, it comes out that the most likely configuration for A and B is slightly closer together than a and b.
 
Last edited:
  • #5
Hey TGlad,
so let me get this straight (am still a high school physics student :P)
The paths
A . . B
| . . |
| . . |
| . . |
| . . |
a . . b
are the paths of normal photons in a stream of light, i.e. side by side. but it is possible to get the second path also? i.e. get path aB and bA? is that what u're saying?
 
  • #6
Lights don't have to move in straight lines, if you don't know.
Light could move in any path in space, but the path which have the highest probability will be observed.

Read this: http://www.scribd.com/doc/7119268/2physics-Qed-Feynman-Qed-the-Strange-Theory-of-Light-and-Matter-Princeton-University-Pre" Chapter 1
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #7
Yes, as Black Integra said, light can take any path it likes, the highest probability path is usually a straight line. See page 73 of the above link.
 
  • #8
Thanks guys... will look through it... i'll probably understand a bit more about this stuff..
 

1. What are photons and how do they interact with electromagnetic fields?

Photons are elementary particles that make up electromagnetic radiation, such as light. They interact with electromagnetic fields by being absorbed, transmitted, or reflected.

2. How are the properties of photons related to their attraction?

The properties of photons, such as their electric and magnetic fields, determine their interaction with other charged particles and objects. This can result in an attractive force between photons and other charged objects.

3. How do scientists explore the electromagnetic properties of photons?

Scientists use a variety of experiments and techniques, such as spectroscopy and interferometry, to study the properties of photons and their interactions with electromagnetic fields.

4. What role do photons play in the electromagnetic spectrum?

Photons make up the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes all forms of electromagnetic radiation from radio waves to gamma rays. Each type of photon has a specific energy and wavelength, which determines its position on the spectrum.

5. What are some practical applications of understanding the electromagnetic properties of photons?

Understanding the properties and interactions of photons has many practical applications, including the development of technologies such as lasers, solar cells, and fiber optics. It also allows for a better understanding of the behavior of light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation in different environments.

Similar threads

Replies
6
Views
730
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
29
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
338
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
11
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
873
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
3
Views
800
Back
Top