Exploring the Potential of Wireless Electricity Implementation and Applications

In summary, the conversation discusses the possible implementation and application of wireless electricity. There is interest and research being conducted in this area, with MIT achieving success in transferring power wirelessly. The potential for using this technology to replace transmission lines in remote areas is also discussed, along with potential limitations and concerns such as the risk of harming living beings in the path of the transmitted energy. Some believe that the technology is not worth serious consideration and has limited applications, while others suggest it could have potential uses in smaller household electronics. Overall, there is a need for further research and development to increase the efficiency and amount of energy that can be transferred wirelessly.
  • #1
AhmedEzz
Can someone tell us about the possible implementation and application of wireless electricity?

I know there is a lot of interest in the topic and recently, I read that MIT made a successful experiment of transferring power wirelessly. If we can concentrate the beam of the transmitting element from the generator to be like a laser and send it efficiently to a reciever in a distant location, couldn't that replace transmission lines, at least to islands and remote areas?

I'm open to a scientific discussion but take in mind that I'm in second year undergrad. so I might not get 100% of what you are saying but still I want to make this beneficial and worthy to be posted on PF.
 
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  • #2
Radio is wireless electricity, and microwaves can be made somewhat directional and concentrated, but in that case, you run the risk of killing anything that flies through the beam. Transmission lines are expensive to set up, but they are about 96% efficient iirc.
 
  • #3
well, yeah you might kill anything that goes between the beam but this is rather a minor issue to my eyes than a major one. All antennas are some form of wireless electricity but they are very small in scale and don't meet the application one might anticipate from "wireless electricity"...However, everyone feel free to either continue on with this discussion or answer to the first post of the possibilities of implementation and applications.
 
  • #4
Far be it from me to say that it will never happen, but I see little chance of our developing wireless transmission systems to convey megawatts of power as we do now with cables. Not only would it be difficult to transmit, receive and distribute significant amounts of power but it would be difficult to confine the energy to be transmitted from a particular source to a particular sink.
 
  • #6
100 views and only 4 replies...whatever happened to those who surf PF?
 
  • #7
AhmedEzz said:
100 views and only 4 replies...whatever happened to those who surf PF?

I think it's because the previous thread that I posted a link to covered the subject pretty well. That's my guess.
 
  • #8
That and there is no direction to this thread, no questions to answer, etc.

There are a number of threads on the subject you can peruse for more info, though: https://www.physicsforums.com/search.php?searchid=1221869
 
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  • #9
In my thoughts this technology should be implemented in smaller household electronics. Charging mp3 players, cell phones, laptops etc... It does use more electricity as it isn't as efficient as a wire.
 
  • #10
Well, any new technology does have its limitations at first but when more promise is being shown more funding kicks in and more research goes on. This is how it works. I think this techonology can have several applications even if we don't imagine those now. For example, how do remote islands in the sea or remote places in the desert receive electricity? maybe we can devise something that looks like the laser beam, of great efficiency that it becomes cost-effective to build those instead of regular transmission lines. We can even use it as a weapon, for example, remotely electructing someone (a bad guy of course ,hehe ^_^)
 
  • #11
berkeman said:
I think it's because the previous thread that I posted a link to covered the subject pretty well. That's my guess.

russ_watters said:
That and there is no direction to this thread, no questions to answer, etc.

There are a number of threads on the subject you can peruse for more info, though: https://www.physicsforums.com/search.php?searchid=1221869
I think it's because this idea is much akin to perpetual motion, time machines and beaming systems...they are not worth serious considerations.

AhmedEzz said:
Well, any new technology does have its limitations at first but when more promise is being shown more funding kicks in and more research goes on. This is how it works. I think this techonology can have several applications even if we don't imagine those now. For example, how do remote islands in the sea or remote places in the desert receive electricity? maybe we can devise something that looks like the laser beam, of great efficiency that it becomes cost-effective to build those instead of regular transmission lines. We can even use it as a weapon, for example, remotely electructing someone (a bad guy of course ,hehe ^_^)
There are already lasers powerful enough to destroy missiles from great distances...the trouble is, the energy transmitted is absorbed as heat on the receiving end and would then have to be converted to usable electric waveforms.
 
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  • #12
isly ilwott said:
I think it's because this idea is much akin to perpetual motion, time machines and beaming systems...they are not worth serious considerations.

The MIT article actually has some semi-useful science in it, but the applications are pretty limited (very short range, low power, etc.).
 
  • #13
berkeman said:
The MIT article actually has some semi-useful science in it, but the applications are pretty limited (very short range, low power, etc.).
Exactly...not worth consideration for transmission of megawatts over appreciable distances.

I have a waterproof, cordless toothbrush that charges via an air gap transformer, but if you lift it an eighth inch, it ceases to charge (at least the "charging" light is extiguished).
 
  • #14
berkeman said:
The MIT article actually has some semi-useful science in it, but the applications are pretty limited (very short range, low power, etc.).

And so did every single technology in its infancy, it needs time to develop. If we research and improve current designs so that we could transmit a signal with very high efficiency over a vast distance (we already do that in outer-space applications) but we need to increase the amount of energy transferred. That is the thing..

-We already know transmit and receive signals over vast vast distances like in satelites.
-What is required is to increase the amount of energy to be transferred and still maintain high efficiency.

Ofcourse there is a limit to that but that limit will determine our application. As either to confine the idea to a house or so or to go large-scale and try to reach remote areas in the world.
 
  • #15
Is all wireless signals right now just sent out in all directions? If so wouldn't they all be following the inverse cube law demonstrating massive power loss? How well would some parabolic device work?
 
  • #16
bassplayer142 said:
How well would some parabolic device work?
A focussed beam would still have inverse square power loss. The main problem with a focussed beam is the inefficency in going from electricity->light/microwave->electricity, to be worthwhile you either need a very good reason to use a beam or a lot of incoming power.

In another thread someone proposed powering equipement by sending laser light down an optical fibre to a photocell because they needed to have no electrical connections to the equipement.
 
  • #17
In a time where massive amounts of power through hydrogen fusion or other this could be very good at powering satellites across the solar system.
 

Related to Exploring the Potential of Wireless Electricity Implementation and Applications

1. How does wireless electricity work?

Wireless electricity, also known as wireless power transfer, uses electromagnetic fields to transfer energy from a power source to an electronic device without the need for physical wires. This is achieved through the use of a transmitter and receiver, which are tuned to resonate at the same frequency. When the transmitter is placed near the receiver, the electromagnetic fields interact and transfer energy, allowing the device to charge or operate.

2. What are the benefits of implementing wireless electricity?

Some of the main benefits of wireless electricity implementation include convenience, safety, and flexibility. With no need for physical wires, devices can be charged and powered without the hassle of plugging and unplugging cords. Wireless electricity also eliminates the risk of electrical shocks or fires due to exposed wires. Additionally, it allows for more flexibility in device placement and reduces clutter caused by multiple cords and chargers.

3. Are there any limitations to wireless electricity?

While wireless electricity has many advantages, there are some limitations to its implementation. The technology is still in its early stages and can currently only transfer power over short distances. This means that devices need to be in close proximity to the transmitter in order to charge or operate. Additionally, the efficiency of wireless electricity is not yet as high as traditional wired electricity, resulting in some energy loss during the transfer process.

4. What are some potential applications of wireless electricity?

There are various potential applications for wireless electricity, including charging mobile devices, powering smart homes and Internet of Things (IoT) devices, and even powering electric vehicles. Wireless electricity could also be used in public places such as airports and cafes to provide convenient charging options for people on the go. In industrial settings, it could be used to power machinery and equipment without the need for cords and outlets.

5. What are the current challenges in implementing wireless electricity?

One of the main challenges in implementing wireless electricity is the need for standardization and compatibility between different devices and technologies. As the technology is still in its early stages, there are different methods and standards being developed by different companies, which could hinder widespread adoption. Additionally, the efficiency and range of wireless electricity need further improvement in order to make it a viable alternative to traditional wired electricity.

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