Faster, narrower fluid same pressure as slower, wider fluid?

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I love PF. This is a great thread. I don't have anything to add except for this:

boneh3ad said:
... It wasn't arbitrary. That was the nominal water pressure supplied to my house that I lived in when I was in graduate school.
The system pressure in my house is ~35 to 40 psig. I get my water from my own well.
 
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boneh3ad
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The system pressure in my house is ~35 to 40 psig. I get my water from my own well.
Yeah some houses in that town were pushing 100 psi, at which point apparently people complained that it hurt to take a shower.
 
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boneh3ad
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Sorry for the double post. Just in case anyone was curious or interested, I also plotted the exit velocity as a multiple of the original flow velocity with no thumb as a function of how much of the hose you cover up:
cGQFwoB.png


I've also plotted the pressure loss due to viscosity in the length of the hose as a function of how much of exit area you cover up:
cSsdsoY.png


This plot of Reynolds number versus the area ratio pretty much explains the trend you see in the losses in the length of the hose:
BI3a4Bk.png


And then finally, I plotted the pressure loss due to your thumb as a function of how much of the exit area you cover up:
rPBrzz3.png


I thought these were kind of interesting and I already had the data calculated so I figured I would share.
 

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