I Finding range of a projectile from a graph

Hey,
I am writing a report where I am trying to investigate the effect of initial velocity on the range of a projectile. Does anyone know any graphs I could use to help me find the range?
Thanks,
 
upload_2016-6-18_13-26-32.png


Range of the Projectile fired at an angle θ from the ground with an initial velocity Vi is given by

upload_2016-6-18_13-26-58.png


So Range is proportional to square of initial velocity keeping angle of projection θ as constant.

But I don't understand your question. Which graph you are talking about?
 
View attachment 102175

Range of the Projectile fired at an angle θ from the ground with an initial velocity Vi is given by

View attachment 102176

So Range is proportional to square of initial velocity keeping angle of projection θ as constant.

But I don't understand your question. Which graph you are talking about?
Apologies, so the report is being done with a sling shot, where the rubberband will be extended to different lengths, as this will affect the initial velocity. Angle is being kept constant and I am not sure which graph to use, however I am expected to manipulate a graph to show the relationship between initial velocity and range, and was wondering if it was possible to find the range through the gradient of a graph.
 
240
42
and was wondering if it was possible to find the range through the gradient of a graph
What do you mean of the "gradient" of the graph? Your graph must mean the range ##R## versus the initial velocity ##v,## and in this single-variable function, the gradient is just the slope.
 
What do you mean of the "gradient" of the graph? Your graph must mean the range ##R## versus the initial velocity ##v,## and in this single-variable function, the gradient is just the slope.
ok yeah I just meant the slope when I said gradient, and was wondering if there were any graphs where the slope is equal to the range, but if not I will just do a graph that shows the range vs initial velocity,
Thanks,
 
240
42
the slope is equal to the range
If you knew the result ##R=\frac{v^2\sin 2\theta}{g},## then you can easily get the slope ##R'(v)=\frac{2v\sin 2\theta}{g}## and can get what point meets your demand, which, however, the condition seems not meaningful... or?
 
ok ye
If you knew the result ##R=\frac{v^2\sin 2\theta}{g},## then you can easily get the slope ##R'(v)=\frac{2v\sin 2\theta}{g}## and can get what point meets your demand, which, however, the condition seems not meaningful... or?
ok yeah that makes sense, thanks
 

Want to reply to this thread?

"Finding range of a projectile from a graph" You must log in or register to reply here.

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top