1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

I Finding range of a projectile from a graph

  1. Jun 18, 2016 #1
    Hey,
    I am writing a report where I am trying to investigate the effect of initial velocity on the range of a projectile. Does anyone know any graphs I could use to help me find the range?
    Thanks,
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 18, 2016 #2
    upload_2016-6-18_13-26-32.png

    Range of the Projectile fired at an angle θ from the ground with an initial velocity Vi is given by

    upload_2016-6-18_13-26-58.png

    So Range is proportional to square of initial velocity keeping angle of projection θ as constant.

    But I don't understand your question. Which graph you are talking about?
     
  4. Jun 18, 2016 #3
    Apologies, so the report is being done with a sling shot, where the rubberband will be extended to different lengths, as this will affect the initial velocity. Angle is being kept constant and I am not sure which graph to use, however I am expected to manipulate a graph to show the relationship between initial velocity and range, and was wondering if it was possible to find the range through the gradient of a graph.
     
  5. Jun 19, 2016 #4
    What do you mean of the "gradient" of the graph? Your graph must mean the range ##R## versus the initial velocity ##v,## and in this single-variable function, the gradient is just the slope.
     
  6. Jun 19, 2016 #5
    ok yeah I just meant the slope when I said gradient, and was wondering if there were any graphs where the slope is equal to the range, but if not I will just do a graph that shows the range vs initial velocity,
    Thanks,
     
  7. Jun 19, 2016 #6
    If you knew the result ##R=\frac{v^2\sin 2\theta}{g},## then you can easily get the slope ##R'(v)=\frac{2v\sin 2\theta}{g}## and can get what point meets your demand, which, however, the condition seems not meaningful... or?
     
  8. Jun 19, 2016 #7
    ok ye
    ok yeah that makes sense, thanks
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Finding range of a projectile from a graph
Loading...