Finding Turning Points of Morse Potential V(x)

In summary: E=\frac{1}{2}m \dot{x}^2 + V(x)t=\frac{1}{2}m \dot{x}-\frac{1}{2}e^{-ax}So substituting in and solving for t, you get t=\frac{1}{2}m \dot{x}-\frac{1}{2}e^{-ax}
  • #1
Logarythmic
281
0
How can I find the turning points for the one dimensional Morse potential

[tex]V(x) = D(e^{-2ax}-2e^{-ax})[/tex]

??
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
It would be a good start to state the DEFINITION of "turning point"!
 
  • #3
That's probably my problem then, what is the definition of "turning point"?
 
  • #4
Can you graph the Morse potential ?

Daniel.
 
  • #5
Yes I have graphed the potential.
 
  • #6
Should I invert the function and find the min and max for x(V) ?
 
  • #7
Turning points are related to the "classically forbidden regions", they are boundaries for these regions. It's easier to see if the problem is unidimensional and you can graph the potential.

Daniel.
 
  • #8
Yes, but how do I determine the turning points?
 
  • #9
By solving an impossible equation. Joking, just solve

[tex] V(x)=E [/tex]

.The eqn is not impossible. It can be brought to an algebraic one, a quadratic one, even.

Daniel.
 
  • #10
But isn't
[tex]E = \frac{1}{2}m \dot{x}^2 + V(x)[/tex]?
 
  • #11
Nope and yes. I assumed you wish to find the classical turning points of the Morse potential and for that you need to solve the eqn i wrote. At these turning points the classical KE is zero.

Daniel.
 
  • #12
Yes of course. But then I've only got V(x) = V(x) ??
 
  • #13
Nope, V(x) is equal to E, the total, given, energy. The E is the a generic notation for the the variable used to index the spectrum of the quantum Hamiltonian.

Daniel.
 
  • #14
Ok, but I'm studying classical mechanics so I think I have to use another approach...
 
  • #15
Alright, then, find the solution from other source and compare to what i said and suggested.

Daniel
 
  • #16
Logarythmic said:
Ok, but I'm studying classical mechanics so I think I have to use another approach...

I'm not aware of another approach. You start off with a certain amount of energy, which is a constant in a conserved system. But the classical turning points are when [tex]\dot{x} = 0[\tex], and then a moment later the velocity changes signs (i.e. the particle goes from going to the right to going to the left), so then you do what Dexter suggests, and hopefully understand why you're doing it.
 
  • #17
I understand this now. I get the equation

[tex]D(e^{-2ax}-2e^{-ax})-E=0[/tex]

Any tricks on how to solve this?
 
  • #18
Yes, i already did tell you b4. Just substitute [itex] e^{-ax} =t [/itex] and then c what you get.

Daniel.
 

Related to Finding Turning Points of Morse Potential V(x)

1. What is a Morse potential?

A Morse potential is a mathematical model used to describe the potential energy of a diatomic molecule. It takes into account the attractive force between the two atoms as well as the repulsive force at very short distances.

2. How do you find turning points of a Morse potential?

The turning points of a Morse potential can be found by solving the equation V'(x) = 0, where V'(x) is the derivative of the potential energy function with respect to the distance between the two atoms. This will give the locations of the turning points, where the potential energy changes from increasing to decreasing or vice versa.

3. Why is it important to find turning points of a Morse potential?

Knowing the turning points of a Morse potential is important in understanding the behavior of a diatomic molecule. It can help determine the stability of the molecule and provide insight into its vibrational and rotational energies.

4. Can turning points of a Morse potential be calculated analytically?

Yes, the turning points of a Morse potential can be calculated analytically by solving the equation V'(x) = 0. However, in some cases, numerical methods may be necessary to find the turning points.

5. How do turning points of a Morse potential affect the potential energy curve?

The turning points of a Morse potential mark the locations where the potential energy curve changes from concave up to concave down or vice versa. This affects the overall shape of the curve and can give information about the strength of the bond between the two atoms in the molecule.

Similar threads

  • Quantum Physics
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
999
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
581
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
19
Views
574
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
1K
Replies
12
Views
466
  • Advanced Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
604
Back
Top