Finite difference method for the diffusion-advection equation

  • #1
LogarithmLuke
83
3
Homework Statement:
Consider the diffusion-advection equation given by ## \mu \Delta u + \mathbf{v} \cdot \nabla u = f \ \text{in} \ \Omega ## with some appropiate boundary conditions. Here the velocity field ##\mathbf{v} : \Omega \rightarrow \mathbb{R}^2## and the source function ## f: \Omega \rightarrow \mathbb{R} ## may depend on the position. Here ##\Delta## is the Laplace operator, and ##\nabla## is the gradient.

Solve the problem on a unit square with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Set up a finite difference scheme using central differences for both the first and second derivatives of ##u##. Implement the scheme. Write your program so it can solve the problem for different choices of ##\mathbf{v}##
Relevant Equations:
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So for my scheme I obtained ##\frac{\mu}{h^2} U_{p}+(\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}-\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{E}+(\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} - \frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{N} - (\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}+\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{W} - (\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} + \frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{N} + \tau = f## however I am not sure this is correct. I am quite new to the finite difference method, and honestly find it quite difficult. I am also not sure how to go about setting up the A matrix and progressing onward to solve the rest of the problem. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
22,330
5,205
You have N, W, and E. What happened to S?

I assume that this is a 2D problem, correct? You should be using subscript indexes of I and J on U, not N, S, E, and W.
 
  • #3
LogarithmLuke
83
3
Yes this is a 2D problem. The last ##U_N## should have been a ##U_S##. Ok so using subscript indicies i and j instead I obtain the following scheme:

##4\frac{\mu}{h^2} U_{i,j}+(\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}-\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i+1,j}+(\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} -\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i,j+1} - (\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}+\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i-1,j} - (\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} + \frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i,j-1} + \tau = f## where ##\tau## is an error term.

Does this seem correct? I realized I had forgotten a factor 4 when I recalculated it.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
22,330
5,205
I think you have the signs wrong on the diffusion terms. I haven't checked the advection terms yet. Are you assume that the two velocity components are independent of x and y? The f term should be subscripted i,j unless f is constant.
 
  • #5
LogarithmLuke
83
3
Im not familiar with what the diffusion terms and advection terms of the equation are. I did not think about whether the velocity components were independent of x and y, I simply dotted the components with the nabla vector for u, where I replaced the partial derivatives with central differences.
 
  • #7
LogarithmLuke
83
3
So this is the correct scheme? ##-4\frac{\mu}{h^2} U_{i,j}+(\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}+\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i+1,j}+(\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} +\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i,j+1} - (\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}-\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i-1,j} - (\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} - \frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i,j-1} + \tau = f_{ij}## How would I transition further to set up the pentadiagonal(?) matrix A to solve the problem?
 
  • #8
22,330
5,205
So this is the correct scheme? ##-4\frac{\mu}{h^2} U_{i,j}+(\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}+\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i+1,j}+(\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} +\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i,j+1} - (\frac{v_{1}}{2 h}-\frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i-1,j} - (\frac{v_{2}}{2 h} - \frac{\mu}{h^2})U_{i,j-1} + \tau = f_{ij}##
. Looks OK.
How would I transition further to set up the pentadiagonal(?) matrix A to solve the problem?
You define a solution vector ##y_k##, and then associate the U values with this vector in order, row-by-row or column-by-column.
 

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