Food as Software and the end of livestock

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential benefits of producing food through bacteria and protein powder, as well as the potential drawbacks in terms of texture and cost compared to traditional food sources. There is also mention of the use of non-animal sources in the production of protein powder and the possibility of genetically redesigned crops for food production. The conversation concludes by acknowledging the speculative nature of the discussion.
  • #1
BWV
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This is a futurist site, curious about how far away this really is

Huge benefits to food security, CO2 emissions, public health etc

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2019/...-is-going-to-radically-change-your-world.html
Screen-Shot-2019-09-28-at-7.57.27-AM.jpg


Screen-Shot-2019-09-28-at-8.02.17-AM.jpg
 
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  • #3
My impression after glancing at this is that they want to make proteins in bacteria to replace/supplement normal foods.
They claim economic benefits.

This seems to me, to be a kind of one dimensional version of food, in particular meat which they reference in the Impossible burger. "Normal" foods are derived from tissues, which cellular structures made of a vast assortment of different proteins, as well as other chemicals, like lipids and carbohydrates. This does not fall out of cultures producing a single kind of protein (or a few) in vast amounts. They would have to combined in some detailed manner to generate equivalent textures.
The impossible burger uses as starting material biological tissue from non-animal sources (but with a cellular structure containing their own complex chemical mixtures.
Perhaps, in the future, growing up only knowing non-textured foods would reduce the economic importance that difference.

Alternatively, you could grow tissue cultures of metazoan cells.
This would be much more difficult and produce cells at much lower densities.
More labor and more costly.
Its hard to believe that growing a crop (perhaps genetically redesigned) to generate a useful component for some complex "artificial" food, like the impossible burger, would not be cheaper ($/Kg) then metazoan tissue culturing it.

Simpler food, OK.
 
  • #4
That was the world’s longest advertisement for protein powder.
 
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Likes russ_watters and jim mcnamara
  • #5
I think we got the point. Thread closed. Really close to too speculative for PF.
 

Related to Food as Software and the end of livestock

1. What is "Food as Software and the end of livestock"?

"Food as Software and the end of livestock" is a concept proposed by scientist and entrepreneur, Pat Brown. It refers to the idea of creating food products using advanced technology and plant-based ingredients, instead of relying on traditional livestock farming methods.

2. How does "Food as Software" work?

The process of creating food as software involves breaking down the molecular structure of plants and reassembling them into food products that mimic the taste and texture of animal-based foods. This is done using advanced techniques such as genetic engineering and fermentation.

3. What are the benefits of "Food as Software"?

There are several potential benefits of "Food as Software" including reducing the environmental impact of traditional livestock farming, improving food safety by eliminating the risk of foodborne illnesses from animal products, and providing a more sustainable and ethical source of food.

4. Will "Food as Software" replace traditional livestock farming?

It is unlikely that "Food as Software" will completely replace traditional livestock farming in the near future. However, it has the potential to greatly reduce the demand for animal products and shift the food industry towards a more plant-based and sustainable model.

5. Are there any concerns about "Food as Software"?

Some concerns about "Food as Software" include the potential for unintended consequences on the environment and human health, as well as the ethical implications of creating food products in a lab rather than from natural sources. More research and regulation will be needed to address these concerns.

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