Force carrier particles i.e. gravitons, photons

  • #1
FeDeX_LaTeX
Gold Member
437
13
Hello;

How do force carrier particles work? For example, if I drop an object, the force of gravity is carried by gravitons. Does this mean that there is a long stream of gravitons underneath/all around the object? Because the wave would need to be carried through the medium of gravitons. Is this true?

Thanks.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
FeDeX_LaTeX
Gold Member
437
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Well, this is all hypothetical, so it may not be true. I'm guessing there isn't much evidence for force carrier particles?
 
  • #3
tiny-tim
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
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They're a mathematical convenience.

The Hamiltonian operator of the force is an infinite sum of products of a finite number of creation and annihilation operators of particles.

For the electromagnetic force between two electrons, for example, or between an electron and a photon, those operators are of electrons and photons.

But that doesn't mean that any electron or photon is actually annihilated or created.

The photon being a "carrier" or "mediator" for the electromagnetic force only means that its operators appear in the Hamiltonian, not that they themselves actually appear in the interaction. :smile:
 
  • #4
FeDeX_LaTeX
Gold Member
437
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I'm confused.... they're there, but also not there?

I have never heard of the Hamiltonian operator, I will google it.
 

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