Formula for combined spring constant.

In summary, the conversation involves someone seeking help with the formula for calculating the combined spring constant of two springs connected end to end. The formula given by the individual is incorrect and does not make sense. Another person offers a hint that two springs in series must have the same tension and provides a correct equation for finding the tension. The original person then attempts to use the hint and asks for clarification. Finally, another hint is given about the spring constants of two pieces of a cut spring.
  • #1
nerfed
2
0
Help - Formula for combined spring constant.

Hey, I was wondering if anyone can help me with the formula to calculate the combined spring constant of two springs stuck together (end to end).

This is as far as I've been able to figure it out lol, I can't wrap my head around this formula. The k1 and x1 are the values of the first spring, and k2 and x2 are the values of the second spring respectively.

F(series) = [(k1)*(k2)] * [(x1)+(x2)]
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
Not sure what that formula means. (The units don't make sense!)

Hint: Realize that two springs in series must have the same tension.
 
  • #3
Heh, yeah, that's why I need the help.

I need to know how to find the spring constant of two springs connected end to end. That botched equation up there is my attempt at it, so I was wondering if you guys knew it.
 
  • #4
You should be able to figure it out with the hint I gave. Use your same notation:
[tex]T = k_1 x_1 = k_2 x_2[/tex]

But the tension is also given by:
[tex]T = k_{series} (x_1 + x_2)[/tex]

Play around with these and see what you can do.
 
  • #5
nerfed,

Here's another hint. If you have a spring with spring constant k and you cut it in two, what are the spring constants (call them k1 and k2) of the two pieces?
 

What is the formula for combined spring constant?

The formula for combined spring constant is K = K1 + K2 + K3 + ... + Kn, where K represents the combined spring constant and K1, K2, K3, ..., Kn represent the individual spring constants of the springs in the combination.

How do you calculate the combined spring constant?

The combined spring constant can be calculated by adding the individual spring constants of the springs in the combination. For example, if there are two springs with spring constants K1 and K2, the combined spring constant would be K = K1 + K2.

Can the combined spring constant ever be less than the individual spring constants?

No, the combined spring constant will always be greater than or equal to the individual spring constants. This is because when springs are combined, they work together to provide a greater force, resulting in a higher spring constant.

What happens to the combined spring constant if one of the springs is removed?

If one of the springs in a combination is removed, the combined spring constant will decrease. This is because there is now less force being applied to the system, resulting in a lower spring constant.

How does the combined spring constant affect the overall stiffness of the system?

The combined spring constant determines the overall stiffness of the system. A higher combined spring constant means a stiffer system, while a lower combined spring constant means a less stiff system. This is because the combined spring constant represents the amount of force required to produce a certain amount of displacement in the system.

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