Frequency spectrum of a clarinet

  • #1
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Hi.

Usually, the clarinet is presented as acting like a pipe system closed at one end, which only allows for harmonics that are odd multiples of the fundamental frequency. I used the app "SpectrumView" by OxfordWaveResearch to measure the following spectrum:
20180619_163908000_iOS.jpg


Fair enough, the amplitudes of the odd harmonics are considerably smaller than the ones of the even harmonics, but far from "absent". I assume that no real-world system satisfies boundary conditions such as "closed pipe" and "open pipe" perfectly and are a mixture between them, but I still would have expected the amplitudes of the odd harmonics to be much smaller.

Is something wrong with my measurement, or is the closed-pipe-nature of a clarinet really THAT indistinct?

As a comparison, the spectrum of the G string of a guitar (which resembles a pipe closed at both ends), which has the same fundamental frequency:
20180619_164045000_iOS.jpg
 

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  • #2
kuruman
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The short answer to your question is that there are reed resonances in the clarinet that fill in the spectrum. There is a wealth of information on clarinets and other instruments here
http://newt.phys.unsw.edu.au/music/clarinet/
 

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