Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster discussions

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In summary, the book "Reflections on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident" was published in Springer in 2014 as a result of a cooperation between Berkeley and Univ. of Tokyo. This book discusses the consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, including radiation monitoring and dose estimation, fish and fishing grounds, agricultural implications, and radioactive releases into the environment.
  • #1
Borek
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There are several threads related to the disaster:

Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants - technical aspects of the situation at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP (and other plants).

Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants part 2 - technical aspects of the situation at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP (and other plants) - part 2 (thread split on September 20th, 2013 for performance reasons).

The "more political thread" besides "Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants" scientific one - discussion about the way crisis was managed both by engineers/management at place and Japanese government.

Fukushima Management and Government Performance

Why is Fukushima nuclear crisis so threatening?

Fukushima radiation detection and measurement

Japan earthquake - contamination & consequences outside Fukushima NPP

Please keep your posts in each thread on topic.
 
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Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Actions taken by regulatory bodies following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident
http://www.oecd-nea.org/nsd/fukushima/

Collection of information published on various websites (TEPCO, IAEA, NISA, WNN, Nucnet, IRSN, GRS, etc.)
https://clearinghouse-oef.jrc.ec.europa.eu/prompt-notifications/fukushima-nuclear-accident/daily-updates-on-the-situation
 
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  • #3
Astronuc said:
Actions taken by regulatory bodies following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident
http://www.oecd-nea.org/nsd/fukushima/

Collection of information published on various websites (TEPCO, IAEA, NISA, WNN, Nucnet, IRSN, GRS, etc.)
https://clearinghouse-oef.jrc.ec.europa.eu/prompt-notifications/fukushima-nuclear-accident/daily-updates-on-the-situation



how can I find the activity of isotope which it has in area given value mCi or mR or Rem value of this? ionization energy of isotope how many distance can it travel on air and in earth-ground when I know only the Curi or Rem or Roengen?

ex. Who they calculate the hazardous-emergency distance from Fukushima accident?
 
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  • #4
Dears! ,

thanks, but, may you have an aprox. number in Rem or mR or Ci by distance?
e.x 800mR radiation source can ionize everything up to 1m
 
  • #5
Borek said:
There are several threads related to the disaster:

Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants - technical aspects of the situation at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP (and other plants).

Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants part 2 - technical aspects of the situation at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP (and other plants) - part 2 (thread split on September 20th, 2013 for performance reasons).

The "more political thread" besides "Japan Earthquake: nuclear plants" scientific one - discussion about the way crisis was managed both by engineers/management at place and Japanese government.

Fukushima Management and Government Performance

Why is Fukushima nuclear crisis so threatening?

Fukushima radiation detection and measurement

Japan earthquake - contamination & consequences outside Fukushima NPP

Please keep your posts in each thread on topic.
Newer item: Springer published a free-downloadable book 2014 caled "Reflections on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident" made as a result of a cooperation between Berkeley and Univ. of Tokyo.
 
  • #6
Mickey1 said:
Newer item: Springer published a free-downloadable book 2014 caled "Reflections on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident" made as a result of a cooperation between Berkeley and Univ. of Tokyo.
Springer published a number of open-access (i.e., free downloads) texts on the consequences of the Fukushima accident.

Reflections on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-12090-4
Radiation Monitoring and Dose Estimation of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-4-431-54583-5
Impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident on Fish and Fishing Grounds
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-4-431-55537-7
Agricultural Implications of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-4-431-54328-2
Agricultural Implications of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident
The First Three Years
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-4-431-55828-6
Agricultural Implications of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident (III)
After 7 Years
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-13-3218-0
Radiological Issues for Fukushima’s Revitalized Future
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-4-431-55848-4
Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Nuclear Risks
Prediction and Assessment Beyond the Fukushima Accident
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-4-431-55822-4
 
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  • #7
I'm pondering on why Fukushima site continues pumping millions of tonnes of water every day into the destroyed reactor thus creating waste water daily? Can they seal the site with concrete like soviet did at Chernobyl?
 
  • #9
Tepco's site says
cooling water is being continuously injected into the reactors and keeping the debris stable.
I'm also wondering about the necessity to pump water into the sites. Presumably now, after some 13 years, any fuel/concrete mass has now solidified, and is stable, and decay heat should be sufficiently low to prevent anything unexpected from happening, but maybe not?
 
  • #10
Gary7 said:
Tepco's site says
Can you please link to the discussion about injecting cooling water.
 
  • #12
Gary7 said:
Presumably now, after some 13 years, any fuel/concrete mass has now solidified, and is stable
As fuel, in known geometric configuration it would be already safe for dry cask storage.
But as debris, it's just a big unknown: if there are enough material around as insulation, the inner temperature might be still high.

Also, based on that infamous 'elephant foot' in Chernobyl it is known that this kind of material is not necessarily stable and might degrade with time => to prevent any particles going airborne it's just better to keep it submerged.
 
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  • #13
My decay heat spreadsheet estimates the 13 year (400 million seconds) power fraction as 6x10-5 (maybe someone else can check this order of magnitude). Assuming BWR-4 initial power at 3000 MWth, that would give a present decay heat of ~600,000 Btu/hr (176 kW). if the injected water boils, it would need about 1.1 gpm (0.25 m3/hr). This is a trickle.
 

Related to Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster discussions

What caused the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster?

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was caused by a powerful earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in 2011. The earthquake caused a loss of power to the nuclear reactors, leading to a failure of the cooling systems and ultimately resulting in a nuclear meltdown.

How did the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster impact the environment?

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster released large amounts of radioactive materials into the environment, which had negative impacts on both land and sea. The disaster resulted in the displacement of thousands of people and caused long-term contamination of the surrounding area.

What were the health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster?

The health effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster are still being studied and debated. However, it is known that the release of radioactive materials can lead to an increased risk of cancer and other health issues in those who were exposed to high levels of radiation.

What measures were taken to contain the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster?

After the disaster, Japanese authorities implemented measures to contain the release of radioactive materials and prevent further contamination. This included evacuating residents from the affected area, decontaminating the surrounding land, and constructing a barrier to prevent contaminated water from reaching the ocean.

Is it safe to visit Fukushima Daiichi now?

The safety of visiting Fukushima Daiichi is still a topic of debate. The Japanese government has declared the area safe for tourists, but there are still restrictions and ongoing cleanup efforts in the surrounding area. It is recommended to follow official guidance and safety protocols if visiting the area.

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