Gasupdrift calculator?

  • #1
astraton2001
1
0
well, don't really know if it's physics or chemical...

gas lighter than air, to be used in a balloon who can fly up by itself.
I only know 3 types: helium, hydrogen, hot air

Are there other, can be used in a ballon?

And how can I calculate how much updrift the gas creates or better, how much weight can how much gas raise?

What is the best gas to be used? I mean, the less gas needed, but the most updrift generated.

Any suggestions?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
HallsofIvy
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
43,021
971
The next lightest gas, after Helium, is Nitrogen. Since air is mostly Nitrogen, you aren't going to get much lift from it!

To calculate the lift from Hydrogen or Helium, you will have to subtract its density from that of air (only slightly more than the density of Nitrogen). Multiplying that difference times the volume of the balloon (multiplying also by g if you used mass density rather than weight density- which is very likely) will give the upward force on the balloon.
 

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