Graph of wikipedia articles about physics

In summary: UTF-8&btnI=I%3A+Knowledge&btnJ=K&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=L3NXU5KfN4K8gwzQH4DYDQ&ved=0CAcQ6AEwAA#hl=en&sa=X&ei=L3NXU5KfN4K8gwzQH4DYDQ&ved=0CAcQ6AEwAA&biw=1366&bih=587In summary, some people think that wikipedia articles could be used to visualize the connection between
  • #1
Robin04
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Is there something that visualizes the connection between different areas of all(/almost all) phyics? It could be easily done with wikipedia articles: every article is a point in a graph and two points are connected if there's a link (one or both ways) between them. Given this, it could help to see the big picture if one wants to read about a certain topic. Is there something like this?
 
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  • #3
It's not exactly what you asked for but, I like this diagram that shows how to get from one unit to another.

SIunitsAndRelationships.jpg
 

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  • #4
jedishrfu said:
There's a video by Domain of Science on Youtube that does a pretty good job of it:



He has others for Math, Chemistry:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxqAWLTk1CmBvZFPzeZMd9A

I saw this, it's pretty good indeed. But I'm thinking of something more precise. Something that could be used by beginner researchers.
 
  • #5
Try Hyperphysics, and don't expect too much :smile:
(physics is a pretty broad subject, you see)
 
  • #6
Robin04 said:
I saw this, it's pretty good indeed. But I'm thinking of something more precise. Something that could be used by beginner researchers.

You could start with this and extend it into secondary fields.
 
  • #7
Way too often there is a significant overlap between areas to make the graph really meaningful when you try to get into details.

Happens with every science, physics is not exceptionally different.
 
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  • #8
Borek said:
Way too often there is a significant overlap between areas to make the graph really meaningful when you try to get into details.

Happens with every science, physics is not exceptionally different.
Maybe those overlap could be visualized on the graph in a meaningful way? I'm just brainstorming here. Do you think this graph is a good idea? I'm a first year undergraduate student, also starting a research project, and I find it hard to see the big picture and I figured this could be helpful.
 
  • #9
Robin04 said:
Maybe those overlap could be visualized on the graph in a meaningful way? I'm just brainstorming here. Do you think this graph is a good idea? I'm a first year undergraduate student, also starting a research project, and I find it hard to see the big picture and I figured this could be helpful.
No, this is a noble way to learn the various parts of Physics. However, to delve deeper than what is shown in the Map of Physics video is probably a waste of your valuable time. Instead I would focus on your courses and not find something that quite possibly will distract you from your primary mission.

Ultimately though you must decide and you must balance your educational needs now with your enthusiasm to do this big picture mapping. As much as it may help others you must focus on your needs and study physics more deeply.
 
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  • #10
You could easily generate this graph yourself - wikipedia is free to download. You just have to figure out a way to define what is an isn't a physics article, which might be non-trivial.

However, I think you'll learn much more about how humans conceptualize physics then you would about physics its self.
 
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  • #11
Robin04 said:
Is there something that visualizes the connection between different areas of all(/almost all) phyics? It could be easily done with wikipedia articles: every article is a point in a graph and two points are connected if there's a link (one or both ways) between them. Given this, it could help to see the big picture if one wants to read about a certain topic. Is there something like this?
There are some here:
https://www.google.ca/search?q=graph+wikipdia+articles+connections
 
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What is a "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics"?

A "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" is a visual representation of the relationships between different Wikipedia articles related to physics. It shows how topics are connected and can help identify common themes and connections between different articles.

How can a "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" be useful for research?

A "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" can be useful for research in multiple ways. It can help researchers identify relevant articles and topics for their study, discover new connections between different topics, and provide a visual overview of the key concepts and themes in the field of physics.

Are there any limitations to using a "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" for research?

Yes, there are some limitations to using a "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" for research. The graph may not include all relevant articles, as it is based on the links between articles on Wikipedia. Additionally, the graph may not accurately reflect the current state of research in the field, as articles may be added, edited, or removed over time.

How is a "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" created?

A "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" is created using network visualization tools and algorithms. The links between articles on Wikipedia are used to create a network, and then the network is visualized using nodes and edges to represent articles and their connections.

Can a "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" be used for other fields of study?

Yes, a "Graph of wikipedia articles about physics" can be used for other fields of study. Similar graphs can be created for any topic or subject area, as long as the articles are linked on Wikipedia. These graphs can provide a useful visual representation of the relationships between different topics and articles in any field.

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