Gravitational Wave Detection Project Help

In summary, the conversation is about a project on Gravitational Wave Detection Techniques using a Michelson Interferometer with minor additions. The main challenge is detecting fringe shifts due to disturbances in the local spacetime fabric. The speaker is seeking advice on how to improve their apparatus and incorporate the intensity of cosmic GW in their project. They are also asking for additional resources and suggestions for their project.
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I am doing a project on Gravitational Wave Detection Techniques, and I am already done with preparing the apparatus for that , its kid of Michelson Interferometer with some minor additions , the wave detection is based on the same basic principle of fringe shift due to path difference in two rays of light , due to disturbances in local spacetime fabric .

But the problem is that at such a small level , its difficult to practically show any determinable fringe shifts , because of highly low intensity GW's at ground level , please advice me , how should I go about , taking my apparatus more closer to the real thing , is there a possibility that somehow I can modify the weak signals ??... should I create a model of planets , and show how the fringe shift is related to the intensity of cosmic GW passed?...Can someone pls guide me , or give me a link to a paper/site that studies the fringe shift with the intensity of wave passed in mathematical form ... etc.

Any sort of additions to my project if possible ..pls advice

thnx
 
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You should contact someone about it.
I don't know where you live, but there is a grav wave lab in Western Australia. Contact Prof D. Blair and with some luck he might tell you about supermirrors and all sorts of stuff.
http://www.gravity.uwa.edu.au/
 
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Hello, thank you for reaching out for help with your Gravitational Wave Detection project. It sounds like you have already made great progress in preparing your apparatus and understanding the basic principles of fringe shift in Michelson Interferometers. However, as you mentioned, detecting gravitational waves at ground level can be quite challenging due to their low intensity.

One suggestion for improving your apparatus is to use more sensitive detectors, such as photodiodes or photomultiplier tubes, which can detect even small changes in light intensity. Additionally, you could try optimizing your interferometer setup to minimize any external noise or interference that could affect your readings.

As for modifying the weak signals, one approach could be to amplify the signal using an amplifier or a lock-in amplifier. This can help make the fringe shifts more distinguishable and easier to detect.

Creating a model of planets and showing how the fringe shift is related to the intensity of cosmic gravitational waves passing through can also be a great addition to your project. Not only will it help demonstrate the concept in a more tangible way, but it will also showcase your understanding of the topic.

In terms of resources, I would recommend checking out research papers published by organizations such as LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) and VIRGO (European Gravitational Observatory), as they have extensive studies on gravitational wave detection using interferometers.

Overall, your project sounds very interesting and I am sure with some modifications and additions, you will be able to showcase the principles of gravitational wave detection effectively. Best of luck with your project!
 

1. What are gravitational waves?

Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of space-time, caused by the acceleration of massive objects. They were first predicted by Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity in 1915.

2. How are gravitational waves detected?

Gravitational waves are detected using specialized instruments called interferometers, which use lasers to measure tiny changes in the distance between two points caused by the passing of a gravitational wave.

3. What is the importance of detecting gravitational waves?

Detecting gravitational waves allows us to study some of the most extreme and energetic events in the universe, such as black hole mergers and supernovae. It also provides a new way to gather information about the universe and test the theories of gravity.

4. What is the current status of the gravitational wave detection project?

The first confirmed detection of gravitational waves was made in 2015 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Since then, multiple detections have been made, and efforts are ongoing to improve detection technology and expand the network of observatories.

5. How does the detection of gravitational waves impact our understanding of the universe?

The detection of gravitational waves has already confirmed some of the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity and provided new insights into the behavior of black holes. It also opens up new avenues for studying the universe, such as using gravitational waves to observe the early moments after the Big Bang.

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