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Featured Hawaii's Kilauea volcano eruption

  1. May 4, 2018 #1

    davenn

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  3. May 4, 2018 #2
    Some amazing photos!

    180504034247-bt106-hawaii-volcano-05042018-exlarge-169.jpg
     
  4. May 4, 2018 #3

    OmCheeto

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    I find it odd that they allowed housing developments to be built upon 200 year old lava fields.

    theyll.let.people.build.anywhere.in.hawaii.png

    Talk about "caveat emptor"!
     
  5. May 4, 2018 #4

    OmCheeto

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  6. May 4, 2018 #5

    nsaspook

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  7. May 4, 2018 #6

    BillTre

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    I have visited that area. An aunt in law lives there.
    That whole area has many housing area among fields.
    There are other much more recently lava'ed (lava inundated) areas nearby.
     
  8. May 5, 2018 #7

    OmCheeto

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  9. May 5, 2018 #8

    Janus

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    Well, my timing could have been better. We are scheduled to arrive on the big island two weeks from today. (Trip planned and booked months ago.)
     
  10. May 5, 2018 #9

    berkeman

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    Can you get a refund, or maybe change to a different island?
     
  11. May 5, 2018 #10

    Janus

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    It's the 2nd island of a two island trip, Maui for 5 nights and 5 nights in Kona. This means that the return flight is booked out of Kona. I'd really rather not have to cut the trip short and rebook out of Maui at this late date. At least we will be on the other side of the island.
    I think we will play it by ear. If things really do go sour while we are in Maui and we end up not being able to get to Kona, at least I had the foresight to get travel insurance on the total cost of the trip.
     
  12. May 5, 2018 #11

    davenn

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    why ?? ....
    gosh what an awesome time to be there !!, I am jealous, I don't get to the "big island" till mid August and the
    activity is likely to have died down by them :frown:

    If I could, I would already be on a plane to Hawaii to photo and video all the action from the volcano
    the eruption is in a reasonably confined region on the SE side of the island. The volcanoes there don't produce huge ash clouds as with volcanoes like Mt St Helens etc because of the very different makeup of the erupted material .... Hawaii volcanoes are pretty much pure basaltic.

    Make the most of it, Janus, you are very fortunate !
    spend the buck on helicopter trips over and around the volcano area and I expect to see lots of photos from you !! that's an order Mr. ! :wink::wink::-p:biggrin:

    Dave
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2018
  13. May 5, 2018 #12

    davenn

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    well, it is pretty much "always" active. there is very few times when lava isn't flowing out to the coast over the last 30+ years since
    the major eruption of 1983
    There's just times when it is REALLY active as in the last several days

    My last trip there was in April 1999 .....

    dave_lava1.jpg dave_lava1a.JPG lava01.jpg plume3.jpg


    Dave
     
  14. May 5, 2018 #13

    Janus

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    Well, there's active and there's ACTIVE. Too much activity and you probably would not be able to get close enough to see anything. The last I heard they had closed the Hawaii Volcanoes Nat. Park for safety reasons.
     
  15. May 5, 2018 #14

    davenn

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    that's why I said helicopters :smile:

    If it is still active when I get there, I will be spending big on helicopter flight(s)


    Wife and I booked our trip there around 3 weeks ago

    Dave
     
  16. May 6, 2018 #15

    OmCheeto

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    Eight fissures open now at Leilani Estates.

    Volcanic activity settles for now, officials say, but it's not over
    Updated: Saturday, May 5th 2018, 9:39 pm PDT

    PUNA, BIG ISLAND (HawaiiNewsNow) -
    As evening fell Saturday, Hawaii County officials said volcanic activity has slowed, but it is not over yet.
    Hawaii County Civil Defense says there are eight open fissures with no new fissures emerging since early Saturday.

    I finally figured out why I was confused about what "Kilauea" meant.
    It's a region.
    Location_Kilauea.png
    Where I live, volcanoes are distinct features, with one hole in the middle.

    Really interesting stuff on the FAQ at the Natl Park Service:
    • Kilauea has been erupting since 1983
    • The current eruption rate of Kilauea volcano is 250,000-650,000 cubic yards/day (200,000-500,000 cubic meters/day).
    • Since the start of the current Kilauea eruption more than 1,400 million cubic meters of lava have been erupted. Mount St. Helens erupted 1 cubic kilometer of ash (about 10 times greater than the current Kilauea eruption).

    That last one is probably why I'm most confused. Mount St. Helens is only 50 miles from my house, and I stay the hell away from it.
    Per wiki; "Approximately fifty-seven people were killed directly from the blast and 200 houses, 47 bridges, 15 miles (24 km) of railways and 185 miles (298 km) of highway were destroyed... More than 4,000,000,000 board feet (9,400,000 m3) of timber was damaged or destroyed, mainly by the lateral blast."

    I think most of the damage happened in less than a hour, while Kilauea's been doing this for 35 years.
    It's no wonder people are living in lava flows: "Between 1986 and 1991, Chain of Craters Road was cut, and the community of Kapa’ahu, the village of Kalapana, and the subdivisions of Kālapana Gardens and Royal Gardens were lost to the lava."

    I was flabbergasted when I zoomed in on what I thought would be the ghost town of Kalapana, only to find dozens of homes there!
    But it's starting to make sense now.
     
  17. May 6, 2018 #16

    davenn

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    I'm reading this and thinking ... is this correct maths ??

    Now I don't claim to be great at math, so please correct me when needed :biggrin: :rolleyes:

    1,400 million cubic metres = 1 billion 400 million (1,400,000,000 ) yes ? ( 1 billion = 1000 million)

    = 1.4 billion cubic metres of material

    1 cubic km = 1000m x 1000m x 1000m .... that is a cube , 1000 metres on each side

    1000 x 1000 x 1000 = 1,000,000,000 ( 1 billion) ( Mt St Helens)

    Kilauea has erupted = 1.4 billion cubic metres or 1.4 cubic km

    hope I have done that correctly ?


    If that is all correct then where does the 10 times more material from St Helens come from (maths wise )??


    Dave
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2018
  18. May 6, 2018 #17

    OmCheeto

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    I also noticed that, and so don't think you are that bad at maths.
    I averaged their "200,000-500,000 cubic meters/day" comment, multiplied it by 35 years, and came up with 4.5 km^3.
    This number is pretty close to what both wiki and the USGS said: 4 km^3(as of 2012) and 4.4 km^3, respectively.

    Numbers for St. Helens were similar:
    4.2 km^3 per wiki
    2.5 km^3 [avalanche only] per the USGS
    . Guessing the ash accounts for the rest of the volume.​

    Perhaps we shouldn't take anything coming out of Hawaii as a "valid reference"
    1. Their volcanoes are flat
    2. 4 ≈ 10 x 4
    3. They measure distance in acres [see below]
    From my Twitter feed this morning:

    Allyson Blair
    [Emmy award winner living in Honolulu]
    ‏Verified account @AllysonBlairTV
    17 hours ago

    #BREAKING This is video just into our newsroom. It was shot 5 acres in on Makamae St. on the Kalapana side. #Kilauea
    [video]
    [ref]​
     
  19. May 6, 2018 #18

    Janus

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    Er, no. Its just that the vast majority of it is below sea level and it is only the top that is sticking out. Mauna Kea is 33,000 ft above the ocean floor. At sea level you are still some 19,000 ft above the base.
     
  20. May 6, 2018 #19

    OmCheeto

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    Glad I'm not the only one whose mind went a little berzerk with this:

    From the UK; "'CURTAIN OF FIRE' Horror as Kilauea volcano in Hawaii spews lava 150ft in the air, cracks streets and torches forests forcing 10,000 people to flee"

    Compared to my interpretation of someone living there:

    Kalapana Lava Refuge
    Moved to Kalapana, from Alaska, back in '82.
    Bought some land, planted some stuff.
    Lava destroyed a lot of it, so I moved to California.
    Then I moved back.
    Come visit!
    Only $100 per night.

    I was last in Hawaii in 1980, on the island of Oahu, and stayed for about 2.5 months. I think that was before all this "perma-volcano" stuff started happening. Hence, why I didn't bother to go visit.
     
  21. May 6, 2018 #20

    OmCheeto

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    I was trying to be "funny"........

    I've also been trying to digitize what's going on, but things are a bit too dynamic at the moment.
    google.earth.vs.usgs.png

    And what are negative depths all about?

    usgs.negative.earthquake.depths.png

    Do earthquakeologists measure depth from sea level?
     
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