Heating Oxygen to Form Plasma: Is It Possible?

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of creating plasma by heating oxygen and whether it is possible to break apart the nucleus of atoms by continuing to heat the plasma. It is mentioned that the ionization energy to free electrons is lower than the energy required to separate neutrons and protons. The idea of using a particle accelerator to break apart radioactive atoms and use the remaining components for nuclear fusion is also discussed as a potential solution for disposing of nuclear waste.
  • #1
Z_E_U_S_@hotmail.com
4
0
I have a question regarding plasma .Suppose i heat a certain amount of dioxygen , O2 , which will first easely break into oxygen and after come to a point where at least 1 electrons gets free of the oxygen atom and hence the substence become plasma according to the definition.

Now , if i keep heating this plasma , will all the atoms left in the oxygen get freed and will it keep going until the point where all the protons and neutrons will get freed to give a plamas containing only protons , electrons and neutrons . Is such a thing possible ??
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
The ionization energy to free the electrons is way lower than the energy required to separate neutrons from protons, correct?
 
  • #3
Yes , that is correct . But still if we keep adding energy when heating ,is the nucleus eventually going to break apart
 
  • #4
Well, yes, but you'd have to heat it a lot, about 10^10 K, where the average thermal energy is in the MeV range, which is the binding energy of neutrons and protons in nucleae.
 
  • #5
Is this more feasible on a small group of atoms in a particule accelerator ?
If so , would'nt it be possible to break , let's say , a group of radioactive plutonium atoms in its nucleous constituants ? This would be some kind of a way to get rid of nuclear wasts (but not a very cheap way).
 
Last edited:
  • #6
I think it is more feasible just to use the plutonium as reactor fuel.
Eventually you get the same result and in the meantime you can get energy out of it.
 
  • #7
True , but what about the nuclear wasts that are not used to make nuclear fission and that are usually disposed.We could get rid of them that way and take the residual protons , neutrons and electrons for fuel for nuclear fusion.
 

1. Can oxygen be heated to form plasma?

Yes, oxygen can be heated to form plasma. Plasma is the fourth state of matter, and it can be formed by heating a gas to extremely high temperatures. Oxygen is a gas at room temperature, but when heated to high temperatures, it can become ionized and form plasma.

2. How hot does oxygen need to be to turn into plasma?

The temperature needed to turn oxygen into plasma varies depending on the pressure and other factors. However, generally, oxygen needs to be heated to temperatures of at least 18,000 degrees Fahrenheit (10,000 degrees Celsius) to form plasma.

3. What happens when oxygen turns into plasma?

When oxygen turns into plasma, the atoms in the gas become ionized, meaning they lose or gain electrons and become positively or negatively charged. This creates a highly energetic and electrically conductive state of matter that can produce intense heat and light.

4. What are the uses of heating oxygen to form plasma?

Heating oxygen to form plasma has various uses in scientific research and industrial applications. For example, plasma can be used in plasma cutting and welding, where intense heat is needed to melt and cut through metal. It can also be used in plasma propulsion systems for spacecraft and in plasma medicine for sterilization and wound healing.

5. Is heating oxygen to form plasma safe?

Heating oxygen to form plasma can be dangerous if not done properly. The extremely high temperatures and ionized particles can pose hazards to human health and safety. Proper safety measures and equipment must be used when working with plasma, and it should only be done by trained professionals in controlled environments.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
976
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
9
Views
3K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Nuclear Engineering
Replies
9
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
6
Views
971
Back
Top