Help with Physics Take Home Test - Horrible at Physics

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In summary, a person weighing 62 kg is skiing down a hill at an angle of 37 degrees from the horizontal. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the skis and the snow is .15. The question is asking for the speed of the skier after 5 seconds, but since this is a take home test, we cannot provide any assistance in solving the problem. Asking for help on a test is a violation of school's honor code and may result in serious consequences.
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hchayer88
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Ok, I am horrible at physics and I have a take home test and I need some help on some of the questions. So if you know how to do them pllease let me know and help me

1.)A 62 kg person is going down hill on a ski run angled at 37 degrees from the horizontal. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the skis and the snow is .15. How fast is the skier going at 5 seconds after starting from rest?
 
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  • #2
We won't solve problems for you. Please show us your work, let us know where you're stuck, and we'll give you guidance so that you can solve the problem yourself.

Edit: Actually, because you're working on a test, I'm afraid we cannot help you at all. Asking for help from other people for a test is certainly a violation of your school's honor code, and is probably justification for expulsion.

- Warren
 
  • #3


Firstly, it is important to understand the given information and what is being asked in the question. The question provides the mass of the person (62 kg), the angle of the ski run (37 degrees), and the coefficient of kinetic friction (0.15). The question is asking for the speed of the skier after 5 seconds, assuming they started from rest.

To solve this problem, we can use the equation for the force of friction: Ff = μmgcosθ, where μ is the coefficient of friction, m is the mass of the skier, g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2), and θ is the angle of the ski run.

We can also use the equation for acceleration: a = (Fnet)/m, where Fnet is the net force acting on the skier.

First, we need to find the net force acting on the skier. This can be done by finding the components of the weight force (mg) and the force of friction (Ff) in the direction of motion. The weight force can be broken down into its x and y components: mgcosθ and mgsinθ. The force of friction is acting in the opposite direction of motion, so its x component is -Ff.

Next, we can use the equation for acceleration to find the acceleration of the skier: a = (Fnet)/m. Since we are given the mass of the skier, we can plug in the values for the net force and mass to solve for acceleration.

Once we have the acceleration, we can use the equation for velocity to find the speed of the skier after 5 seconds: v = u + at, where u is the initial velocity (0 m/s) and t is the time (5 seconds).

By plugging in the values for acceleration and time, we can solve for the final velocity (v), which will give us the speed of the skier after 5 seconds.

Remember to always double check your units and make sure they are consistent throughout the problem. In this case, the mass is given in kilograms and the force of friction is in Newtons, so you may need to convert the mass to kilograms (by dividing by 1000) and the force to Newtons (by multiplying by 9.8).

I hope this helps you understand how to approach this problem. If you need further clarification or assistance, feel free to reach
 

Related to Help with Physics Take Home Test - Horrible at Physics

1. How can I improve my understanding of physics for the take home test?

The best way to improve your understanding of physics is to actively engage with the material. This can include attending lectures, completing practice problems, and discussing concepts with classmates or a tutor. It's also important to make sure you have a solid understanding of the basic principles and equations before attempting more complex problems.

2. What are some strategies for studying for the physics take home test?

Some helpful strategies for studying for the physics take home test include breaking up the material into smaller chunks, creating study guides or flashcards, and practicing with past exams or problem sets. It can also be beneficial to work through problems with a study group or to seek help from your instructor or a tutor.

3. I struggle with math, how can I still do well on the physics take home test?

Physics does involve a lot of math, but there are ways to approach it even if math is not your strong suit. First, make sure you have a strong understanding of the fundamental math concepts that are used in physics, such as algebra and trigonometry. Additionally, try breaking down the problems into smaller steps and using visual aids, such as diagrams or graphs, to help you understand the concepts.

4. How important is it to understand the theories behind physics for the take home test?

Understanding the theories behind physics is crucial for doing well on the take home test. While it may be tempting to simply memorize equations and plug in numbers, having a deeper understanding of the underlying theories will help you solve problems more effectively and accurately. It will also ensure that you are able to apply your knowledge to unfamiliar or complex scenarios.

5. Are there any online resources that can help me with the physics take home test?

Yes, there are many online resources available to help you with the physics take home test. Some helpful websites include Khan Academy, Physics Classroom, and HyperPhysics. Additionally, many textbooks have online resources such as practice problems and interactive simulations. It's important to use these resources as a supplement to your own studying and not rely on them entirely.

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