High voltage circuit with voltmeter in between

In summary: Rp = ( Rs * 15 kV ) / 50 VSo, to get the desired reading of 50 V, you would need a resistor of 1794 Megohms.
  • #1
ddobre
33
2

Homework Statement


zgukXFk.jpg

You have a voltmeter with an internal resistance of 10 MΩ. You would like to measure a very large voltage source, but you notice that this overwhelms your voltmeter, and you begin to get inaccurate results if the voltage is too high. You design the circuit shown above as a workaround. When measuring a voltage source of 15 kV, you would like your voltmeter to read 50 V. What value of R must you use to achieve this?

Homework Equations


Vab = (emf) - Ir

V = IR

(Parallel): 1/Req = 1/R1 + 1/R2

(Series): Req = R1 + R2

The Attempt at a Solution


The first thing I tried was to calculate current with Vab = 50v, emf = 15000v, and r = 10MΩ, to which I got I = .001495A . After calculating this I got a little confused as to which equation to use next because of the location of the voltmeter. I know that in series the current remains the same, but also the voltmeter is kind of like a resistor too, one which is in parallel with the 15MΩ resistor. One attempt of mine was to calculate Req for the parallel situation of the voltmeter and the 15MΩ resistor, with Req = 6000000Ω. From there, I tried setting up a series equation with the Req just calculated as a single resistor in series with the R resistor I am looking for. But this is where I got confused. I tried equating different values using V1/R1 = V2/R2: (50v)/(6000000Ω) = (15000v)/R, getting R = 1800000000Ω. But, I think this is out of proportion with the rest of the circuit. Any advice?
 

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  • #2
You are close but have forgotten the last step subtraction.

Use SI multipliers not strings of zeros.
Replace the decimal point with the multiplier.
10M0 meter in parallel with 15M0 = 6M0
Current needed is then 50V / 6M0 = 8u333 A
15k V / 8u333 A = 1G8 ohms total.
But must subtract the 6M0 so R = 1G8 – 6M0 = 1G794 ohms = 1794 Megohm.
 
  • #3
Baluncore said:
You are close but have forgotten the last step subtraction.

Use SI multipliers not strings of zeros.
Replace the decimal point with the multiplier.
10M0 meter in parallel with 15M0 = 6M0
Current needed is then 50V / 6M0 = 8u333 A
15k V / 8u333 A = 1G8 ohms total.
But must subtract the 6M0 so R = 1G8 – 6M0 = 1G794 ohms = 1794 Megohm.

Ah, so some of my work is okay. But why do I subtract the Req = 6M0 from the 1G8? I'm assuming it has something to do with the parallel situation, because resistance goes down with resistors in parallel? Or does that not really apply here to this subtraction?
 
  • #4
The common reference voltage is the bottom line.
Resistors in series add. The voltages across series resistors add.

The meter and parallel resistor are equivalent to a 6M0 resistor. Call it Rp.
The high value series resistor is Rs.
Together, Rs and Rp make a potential divider.

Since the same current flows through both Rs and Rp we have;
current = ( Rs + Rp ) / 15 kV = Rp / 50 V
Rs + Rp = Rp * 15 kV / 50 V
Rs = ( Rp * 15 kV / 50 V ) – Rp
 

Related to High voltage circuit with voltmeter in between

1. How does a high voltage circuit with a voltmeter work?

A high voltage circuit with a voltmeter works by measuring the voltage difference between two points in the circuit. The voltmeter is connected in parallel with the circuit, allowing it to measure the potential difference without altering the flow of current.

2. What is the purpose of having a voltmeter in between a high voltage circuit?

The purpose of having a voltmeter in between a high voltage circuit is to measure the voltage drop across a particular component or section of the circuit. This allows for troubleshooting and monitoring of the circuit's performance.

3. Can a voltmeter handle high voltage?

Yes, there are voltmeters specifically designed to handle high voltage measurements. They are equipped with voltage dividers and protective circuits to ensure accurate readings and prevent damage to the device.

4. How do I read the measurements on a voltmeter in a high voltage circuit?

The measurements on a voltmeter in a high voltage circuit are typically displayed in volts (V) or kilovolts (kV). It is important to make sure the voltmeter is set to the correct range for the voltage being measured, and to read the values carefully to ensure an accurate reading.

5. Is it safe to use a voltmeter in a high voltage circuit?

When used properly and with the right equipment, it is safe to use a voltmeter in a high voltage circuit. However, it is important to follow all safety precautions and use appropriate personal protective equipment to minimize the risk of electric shock or injury.

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