Hollow sphere or sphere with beams

In summary, the conversation discussed the strength of two different metal sphere structures when submerged in a fluid. Initially, it was assumed that a hollow sphere would be stronger due to equal pressure exerted by the fluid. However, for larger spheres in a gravitational field, the pressure gradient would differ at the top and bottom. The discussion then shifted to the effects of external factors such as sound waves, impact, and stratified fluids. One person argued for a structure with a bone matrix, while the other favored a plain hollow sphere. It was also mentioned that the type of fluid would play a role in the strength of the structure.
  • #1
qbit
39
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A friend and I debated what is the 'stronger' structure: a hollow (fluid filled) metal sphere or a metal sphere with one or more metal cross beams that span the sphere diagonally given that the same quantity of material is used in both. By 'stronger' I mean the resistance to compressional forces involved in submerging this structure in a fluid such that there is a pressure difference between the inside and outside of the sphere.
Initially we assumed the simple plain hollow sphere since a fluid should exert an equal force over the entire surface. However, for a larger sphere immersed in a fluid that's in a gravitational field, the 'top' of the sphere will experience less pressure that the 'bottom' of the sphere. But presumably the fluid inside the sphere would have a similar pressure gradient since it is in the same gravitational field.
We were still leaning in favour of the plain hollow sphere when we wondered how robust it would be should the fluid it's immersed in have sound waves with large amplitudes moving through it, or when it impacted a solid surface, or found itself at the interface of two stratified fluids. That's when the debate became more animated: I insisted that a structure like a bone matrix in the sphere would be best while my friend stuck to the plain hollow sphere.
 
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  • #2
Any comments would be appreciated.
 
  • #3
If the Fluid in the sphere a liquid like water, then this would be much stronger since the compressibility of water is so small that the metal deformation can account for that.
 

1. What is a hollow sphere or sphere with beams?

A hollow sphere or sphere with beams refers to a spherical structure with empty space inside or with supporting beams or struts attached to the surface.

2. What is the purpose of a hollow sphere or sphere with beams in science?

In science, a hollow sphere or sphere with beams is used as a model to study the behavior of gases, fluids, and other materials under different conditions.

3. How is a hollow sphere or sphere with beams different from a solid sphere?

A solid sphere is a three-dimensional object with a continuous and solid surface, while a hollow sphere or sphere with beams has empty space or additional structures inside or attached to the surface.

4. What are some real-life examples of hollow spheres or spheres with beams?

Some examples of hollow spheres or spheres with beams in real life include bubbles, balloons, and some types of sports balls such as soccer balls and tennis balls.

5. What are the applications of studying hollow spheres or spheres with beams?

The study of hollow spheres or spheres with beams has various applications in fields such as physics, chemistry, and engineering, including understanding the behavior of materials under pressure, designing structures with optimal strength and weight, and developing new technologies.

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