How Do Differential Forms Impact the Modeling of Physical Interactions?

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In summary: However, this is the only interaction that is truly scale invariant, and gravity has a modified scale invariance. Therefore, it is important to use differential forms with caution and not be too enamored by their neatness and conciseness, as they may not be applicable to other interactions and may even complicate equations.
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When ever we find a new interaction that needs to be described we tend to model it on the most understood interaction, both theoretically and experimentally, namely Electrodynamics. But that has a hidden danger, and one element of that danger is differential forms. They are certainly very nifty in their working, and they make for neat concise equations. So how can they be dangerous?

First, Electromagnetism, as exemplified by Maxwell's Equations, is scale invariant. This is uaually stated by saying that the Photon has zero rest mass. More correctly, the virtual Photon can have any mass squared from a very high to a very low number, because in any practical apparatus many of the Photon events are virtual. If we build an electrical apparatus that is half or twice the size of another it will probably work just fine.

It is this very scale invariance that makes it possible to use diff forms to describe electromagnetism, but it is the ONLY interaction that is truly scale invariant. Gravity has a modified scale invariance, so they can be used with caution. But all the other interactions are short range, so we should expect that diff forms can not be applied to them, or if they are they will more likely increase the complexity of our equations because we will have to subtract out all the terms that are scale invariant in our description.

So my advice is use diff forms with caution and don't be too intranced by their neatness and concisenes. −
 
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Originally posted by Tyger
When ever we find a new interaction that needs to be described we tend to model it on the most understood interaction, both theoretically and experimentally, namely Electrodynamics. But that has a hidden danger, and one element of that danger is differential forms. They are certainly very nifty in their working, and they make for neat concise equations. So how can they be dangerous?

First, Electromagnetism, as exemplified by Maxwell's Equations, is scale invariant. This is uaually stated by saying that the Photon has zero rest mass. More correctly, the virtual Photon can have any mass squared from a very high to a very low number, because in any practical apparatus many of the Photon events are virtual. If we build an electrical apparatus that is half or twice the size of another it will probably work just fine.

It is this very scale invariance that makes it possible to use diff forms to describe electromagnetism, but it is the ONLY interaction that is truly scale invariant. Gravity has a modified scale invariance, so they can be used with caution. But all the other interactions are short range, so we should expect that diff forms can not be applied to them, or if they are they will more likely increase the complexity of our equations because we will have to subtract out all the terms that are scale invariant in our description.

So my advice is use diff forms with caution and don't be too intranced by their neatness and concisenes. −

I don't quite get it. What is scale invariance have to do with differential forms?

Instanton
 

Related to How Do Differential Forms Impact the Modeling of Physical Interactions?

1. What are diff forms?

Diff forms, short for differentiation forms, are mathematical tools used to calculate the rate of change of a function with respect to its independent variables. They are commonly used in calculus and physics to solve problems involving motion and change.

2. How are diff forms different from regular differentiation?

Diff forms differ from regular differentiation in that they take into account the direction of change in addition to the magnitude of change. This allows for a more accurate calculation of the rate of change in multidimensional or vector functions.

3. What are the dangers of using diff forms?

There are no inherent dangers in using diff forms, as they are simply a mathematical tool. However, as with any mathematical concept, there is a risk of making errors in calculations if the principles and formulas are not fully understood or applied correctly.

4. Can diff forms be used in fields other than mathematics and physics?

Yes, diff forms have applications in various fields such as engineering, economics, and biology. They can be used to model and analyze systems and processes that involve change, such as population growth, financial investments, and chemical reactions.

5. Is it necessary to have a deep understanding of calculus to use diff forms?

While a basic understanding of calculus is necessary to use diff forms, it is not necessary to have a deep understanding of the subject. As long as the principles and formulas are understood and applied correctly, diff forms can be used effectively even by those with limited calculus knowledge.

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