How Does a Calorimeter's Composition Impact Heat Transfer Calculations?

In summary: The final specific heat of block 2 will be the sum of the specific heat of block 1 and the water's heat of vaporization.
  • #1
mirandasatterley
62
0
"An aluminum calorimeter with a mass of 100g contains 250g of water. The calorimeter and water are in thermal equilibrium at 10.0Degree C. Two metalic blocks are placed into the water. One is a 50g piece of copper at 80.0 degree C. The other block has a mass of 70.0g and is origionally at a temperature of 100degree C. the entire system stabalizes at a final temerature of 20degree C. Determine the specific heat of the unknown sample.

I know that for general cases;
Q(water) = -Q(x) Where x is the substance put into the water
mcdeltaT(water) = - mcdeltaT(x)

My first question is: Does the fact that the calorimeter is made of aluminum affect the Q(calorimeter) part, which is Q(water) in my previous equation? If it does, any hints on how. I think I have to add the masses, but I am unsure about the specific heat part.

My other question is: How do I deal with two objects being put into the water?

Any help is appreciated.
 
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  • #2
The aluminum warms up with the rest of the system. You will need to include it in your heat transferr calculations.
 
  • #3
mirandasatterley said:
"An aluminum calorimeter with a mass of 100g contains 250g of water. The calorimeter and water are in thermal equilibrium at 10.0Degree C. Two metalic blocks are placed into the water. One is a 50g piece of copper at 80.0 degree C. The other block has a mass of 70.0g and is origionally at a temperature of 100degree C. the entire system stabalizes at a final temerature of 20degree C. Determine the specific heat of the unknown sample.

How do I deal with two objects being put into the water?QUOTE]
 
  • #4
mirandasatterley said:
How do I deal with two objects being put into the water?
The water, copper, and aluminum have known masses and specific heats (you may have to look them up). The only unknown is the specific heat of the unknown sample.
 
Last edited:
  • #5
OlderDan said:
The water, copper, and aluminum have known masses and specific heats (you may have to look them up). The only unknown is the specific heat of the unknown sample.

Can i use the equation;

Q(calorimeter) + Q(water) = Q(Block 1) + Q(Block 2)

Then solve for the specific heat capacity of block 2?
Is it correct to add them like This?
 
  • #6
mirandasatterley said:
Can i use the equation;

Q(calorimeter) + Q(water) = Q(Block 1) + Q(Block 2)

Then solve for the specific heat capacity of block 2?
Is it correct to add them like This?

Yes. Since the final temperature attained is 20 deg C, the calorimeter and water gains heat energy while the 2 blocks lose energy.
 

Related to How Does a Calorimeter's Composition Impact Heat Transfer Calculations?

1. What is the aluminum calorimeter problem?

The aluminum calorimeter problem is a scientific experiment that involves heating water in an aluminum container and measuring the temperature change over time to determine the specific heat capacity of the aluminum.

2. Why is the aluminum calorimeter problem important?

The aluminum calorimeter problem is important because it allows scientists to accurately measure the specific heat capacity of aluminum, which is a crucial factor in many industrial and scientific processes.

3. How is the aluminum calorimeter problem conducted?

The aluminum calorimeter problem involves filling an aluminum container with a known mass of water and heating it to a specific temperature. The temperature change of the water is measured over time, and the specific heat capacity of aluminum is calculated using the measured data.

4. What are the possible sources of error in the aluminum calorimeter problem?

Possible sources of error in the aluminum calorimeter problem include heat loss to the surroundings, incomplete mixing of the water, and variations in the heating element's temperature.

5. What are the applications of the aluminum calorimeter problem?

The aluminum calorimeter problem has applications in various fields, such as materials science, engineering, and thermodynamics. It can be used to determine the specific heat capacity of different types of aluminum, which can then be applied in various industrial processes and designs.

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