How does emergent spacetime work?

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  • #1
wolram
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Summary:

I have been reading a little about it but it doesent make sence to me

Main Question or Discussion Point

How can space time emerge from nothing, I mean nothing in the absolute case is voide of any thing, I can imagine the BB where there is a primordial plasma the expands and creates the matter and space, but space time from nothing is beyond me, me being stupid and uneducated.
 

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  • #2
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Summary:: I have been reading a little about it but it doesent make sence to me

but space time from nothing is beyond me, me being stupid and uneducated.
Its not about you..no one knows the answer of that question
 
  • #3
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How can space time emerge from nothing
And in what textbook or peer-reviewed paper did you read that it can emerge from nothing?
 
  • #4
PeterDonis
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I have been reading a little about it
Where? Please give a specific reference.
 
  • #6
wolram
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Well I thought that geometry was nothing, its just a mathmatical formula ie nothing
 
  • #7
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I used a search option and it did not find the word "nothing" in your link.
 
  • #8
wolram
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I used a search option and it did not find the word "nothing" in your link.
????????? That was a draft I dont know how I posted it.
 
  • #9
PeterDonis
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thought that geometry was nothing, its just a mathmatical formula ie nothing
Don't confuse the mathematical formula with what it describes. The word "geometry" can be used to refer to both. For example, in the GR literature the term "spacetime geometry" is often used. That term is not referring to the mathematical formulas that physicists write down; it's referring to what those formulas describe, the real thing that is called "spacetime" and the real properties it has that we describe using the mathematical formulas of geometry.
 
  • #10
haushofer
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Afaik, in the emergent scenario space(time?) and its geometry emerges from yet unknown fundamental degrees of freedom. Just like Maxwell didn't know the details of atoms yet could derive thermodynamical properties via statistics, people now try to derive geometry from the quantum entanglement of the yet unknown "fundamental spacetime degrees of freedom".

"Nothing" enters nowhere. It didn't for Maxwell and co., and it doesn't here.
 
  • #11
phinds
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Lawrence Krauss wrote a whole book on the subject (A Universe From Nothing) but that's a pop-science presentation and if that's where you got it, you should not take it seriously.
 
  • #12
pinball1970
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Lawrence Krauss wrote a whole book on the subject (A Universe From Nothing) but that's a pop-science presentation and if that's where you got it, you should not take it seriously.
Is there nothing of value in that book?
 
  • #13
phinds
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Is there nothing of value in that book?
It's been quite a while since I read it and I don't really recall. I DO remember being very put off by his certitude about his central premise which is that the universe evolved from nothing. I don't even remember how, or if, he defined "nothing" and I considered his thesis just a personal opinion (HE feels that he "proved" it, but ... )

I would add, I find Krauss very entertaining, both in his TV appearances and in his books, but he IS a bit of a pain sometimes.
 
  • #14
pinball1970
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It's been quite a while since I read it and I don't really recall. I DO remember being very put off by his certitude about his central premise which is that the universe evolved from nothing. I don't even remember how, or if, he defined "nothing" and I considered his thesis just a personal opinion (HE feels that he "proved" it, but ... )

I would add, I find Krauss very entertaining, both in his TV appearances and in his books, but he IS a bit of a pain sometimes.
He uses the word plausible a lot both in the book and presentations on it.
An emphasis on the evidence that suggests the observable universe is flat is made a lot.
That's what I remember but I'll have to read it again.

If the universe is infinite then I suppose time has always been and did not need to to emerge in the first place? Or space?
 
  • #15
phinds
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If the universe is infinite then I suppose time has always been and did not need to to emerge in the first place? Or space?
When you see "The universe may be infinite", it means in EXTENT, not in duration, so your logic is based on a mistaken premise.
 
  • #16
pinball1970
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When you see "The universe may be infinite", it means in EXTENT, not in duration, so your logic is based on a mistaken premise.
So time could be emergent but space may not be?
Ok.
Something to think about.
 
  • #17
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I think there is a some confusion here, there are serious suggestions that the universe evolved from nothing , Krauss just popularised the idea but in a academic form you can read this paper here:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0370269382908668

There is a different idea going around where space and time are emergent , in this sense of not fundamental. I think this is a separate idea and nothing to do with the paper I have linked to above. If anyone disagrees let me know, I have heard some people say it is emergent from entanglement but maybe someone can explain how this is supposed to work, as I understood entanglement is between particles, so are particles supposed to be fundamental?
 
  • #18
PeterDonis
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So time could be emergent but space may not be?
No. Whether or not spacetime is emergent from something more fundamental is independent of whether or not the spacetime that describes our universe is infinite in spatial extent or infinite in time extent.
 
  • #19
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From "nothing"? If it is emergent, it's from something but they don't know what that could be. Calling it "nothing" is wrong.
 
  • #21
haushofer
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From "nothing"? If it is emergent, it's from something but they don't know what that could be. Calling it "nothing" is wrong.
"Nothing" in itself is an inconsistent term. But if you want to assign something to it, the quantumvacuum of spacetime is not such a bad choice. A better approach to "nothing" is hard to find ;)
 
  • #22
pinball1970
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  • #24
haushofer
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Well, my impression of the book: it contains nice cosmology at the popular level and interesting ideas, but steps over many subtleties way too easy and pretends way too much. The praise of Dawkins in the forword (comparing it to Darwin's Origin of Species) is simply ridiculous.

In the end, Krauss' claim that we don't need god to explain the universe is not even wrong. It wasn't a problem in the first place, and the proposed solution for this non-existent problem is highly hypothetical and poorly understood. Admitting this is plain and simple intellectual integrity.
 
  • #25
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My knowledge in physics/cosmology is very basic and my math is even worse, but I've always liked the idea of a universe from nothing. I think this is partly due to me being an atheist (no need for a creator), and also from my basic understanding of how the universe works. The universe seems to be made up of positives and negatives, like energies and charges, where the sum of these properties is zero.

Also, i think experiments have shown that the vacuum of space is filled with particle/antiparticle pairs being created from the vacuum (borrowing energy from nothing) and then annihilating and paying the energy back to the vacuum, is that correct?

Most people think of 'nothing' as the vacuum of space where no matter/energy is present, but for me, a true nothingness would be no matter, no radiation, no time and no spatial dimensions. I don't think we can comprehend what that 'true nothingness' is because we only know of something.
 

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