How many foreign languages do you speak/read?

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How many foreign languages do you speak/read?

  • I speak no other language except my native language

    Votes: 18 25.0%
  • I speak/read one foreign language

    Votes: 23 31.9%
  • I speak/read two foreign languages

    Votes: 17 23.6%
  • I speak/read three or more foreign languages

    Votes: 17 23.6%

  • Total voters
    72

brewnog

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A pegasus crossing is for horses! It's got high-level button buzzer things so horse riders don't have to get off. And there's more space around them too I think.
 
The dutch really are amazing linguists. :) A real heavy Nord Holland accent speaking English, does however sound totally demented, like the CEO of Shell...
I actually rarely take offense at having my grammar and spelling corrected by a Dutchman, those crazy Hollanders certainly know how to speak English, even if we don't :smile: English in this country has hundreds of dialects and a million and one slang words. Tha knows lad, baint nothing to hear an odd word on the tongue up t'North.

Why aye man, s'like proper English.

Now aint that pretty moi luverr.

She was like reet fit and right gorgeous, and I'd have given 'er a bit of hows your father and no messin'.

Ay ay, slike we're Northern but we ave bit of a laff about the words, and those boook reading Southern nancies aint nothin' on us Northerners.

You're avin' a giraffe aint ya? Northern munkeys, used to be a bath rather than a giraffe, in the war.:smile:
 
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cristo

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A pegasus crossing is for horses! It's got high-level button buzzer things so horse riders don't have to get off. And there's more space around them too I think.
That's what I was thinking, but since I've never seen one, I couldn't imagine that there were enough horses being ridden around busy roads to warrant the invention of such a crossing!
 
210
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aye I ken wit yer saying oh these gallas dialects, tho scots tisnea really English anymore tho, ya ken, mucker?
 

Chi Meson

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I became fluent in Spanish during High school (our teacher was from Barcelona, so I pronouce my "s's" like "th's"). THen I learned German in College. Now the two are mixed up.

"Abren sie la ventana, por bitte."
"Mach die fenster cerrado."
 
61
2
I am fluent with english, then have studied: zulu, afrikaans, german, french, japanese and I am currently being taught romanian by my romanian penpal. I do however mix english in if I am speaking a language and don't know a word, just put on the accent and say the english word, they sometimes understand what I mean
 

Chi Meson

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aye I ken wit yer saying oh these gallas dialects, tho scots tisnea really English anymore tho, ya ken, mucker?
Aye! I wis jist gaunnae say tha'.
 
1,986
5
okay am I the only one for three? Proofs how old I am. In the dark ages of the educational system in the Netherlands, it was mandatory to study three foreign languages (German, French, English) with the philosophy that a small country has a lot of foreign neighbours. German and French are not a problem, but English..
Being able to speak many languages is great, but, each time I visit the Netherlands I get bombarded with anglicisms and Americanisms.

Once I was in a regular coffee shop, you have to qualify that when you visit the Netherlands, in Rotterdam, and looked at the menu, no "klein", "middel" and "groot" but " small", "medium" and "large" :bugeye:

It is funny, many Dutch insist on immigrants taking integration classes and exams while at the same time their speaking is loaded with anglicisms and their culture is infested with Americanisms.
 

Gokul43201

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This brings my foreign language total down to zero...though if I add up my grammatical and vocabularistic skills in German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Chinese, Greek, Latin and Creole, I might be able to match nearly any 3-year-old.
 

radou

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It is funny, many Dutch insist on immigrants taking integration classes and exams while at the same time their speaking is loaded with anglicisms and their culture is infested with Americanisms.
Same story with the Germans.
 
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It is funny, many Dutch insist on immigrants taking integration classes and exams while at the same time their speaking is loaded with anglicisms and their culture is infested with Americanisms.
Its simply because of hollywood...
 
Same story with the Germans.
English maths is loaded with Liebnitzism's :smile: works both ways.

[tex] \frac {dy}{dx} = \frac {dy}{du}.\frac{du}{dx}[/tex]

I always found the short hand easier to deal with though as in this case it's a little different than simply fractions but the multiple chain rule shows how they cancel out.

7231ba07d510f6f0b7362b08447c32b2.png


[tex]F'(x) = f '(g(x)) g '(x)[/tex] depends on the equation
 
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4,453
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Being able to speak many languages is great, but, each time I visit the Netherlands I get bombarded with anglicisms and Americanisms.

Once I was in a regular coffee shop, you have to qualify that when you visit the Netherlands, in Rotterdam, and looked at the menu, no "klein", "middel" and "groot" but " small", "medium" and "large" :bugeye:

It is funny, many Dutch insist on immigrants taking integration classes and exams while at the same time their speaking is loaded with anglicisms and their culture is infested with Americanisms.
You're quite right, although there are a few odd Dutch words, which still survive. Quite a interesting difference with Germany where I live currently, where puritism rules, as well as in France. Almost everywhere a computer is a computer except for the Germany ("Rechner") and the French ("ordinateur"). Also foreign movies are spoken in, instead of using subtitles. This is perhaps why Dutch youth have quite a edge over their German and French counterparts, for learning other languages.

But other elements of the Dutch culture as in art, architecture, writing, theatre, kitchen, etc is still existing and some people think that it should stay that way, therefore one should learn about tulips, windmills, wooden shoes, nasi goreng and taxes in the intergration classes
 
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arildno

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English, German and the linguistic perversion known as Neo-Norwegian
 
I speak English, and that's about it. I took 2 years of Spanish in High School...and remember none of it.

I think I'll minor in German though, I've always wanted to go there.
 
854
16
I can for the being able of speak three languages, English the best.
 

Moonbear

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I'm fluent in two languages...American English and British English (brilliant!). :biggrin:

I learned Spanish in college, but haven't used it in so long, I'd be hard-pressed to construct a single sentence anymore. I used to be pretty good at understanding spoken Spanish (having been immersed in it by association with a Spanish-speaking friend and all her Spanish-speaking family and acquaintances), but was never very good at speaking it.

I used to be able to read Latin too, but that's not very useful for anything other than knowing the origin of medical/anatomical terms.
 

Pyrrhus

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My native language is Spanish. I speak fluently english, and i speak with the profiency of a toddler russian and portuguese.
 
1,062
6
My native language is English. I am slowly learning Russian though.
 

jtbell

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15,369
3,115
Quite a interesting difference with Germany where I live currently, where puritism rules, as well as in France. Almost everywhere a computer is a computer except for the Germany ("Rechner") and the French ("ordinateur").
German purism is far from absolute. :smile: When I visited Germany a couple of years ago, I was amused to see the spread of the word "Ticket" in place of "Fahrkarte", for example in the "Tagesticket" that many city bus/tram systems offer.
 
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I only speak english, if I had to I might be able to get by in french, but it would be tough......I can hardly remember any of it anymore. I would love to learn russian one day, I'm hoping to maybe start learning it as an arts option next year.
 

radou

Homework Helper
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Interesting, a lot of people seem to like Russian. I wonder what the motivation is. Does it sound so exotic?
 
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Interesting, a lot of people seem to like Russian. I wonder what the motivation is. Does it sound so exotic?
I've just always been fascinated by the country, I love reading and learning about it. I'd really like to go there one day and figure it would be easier if I understand the language haha. My grandma was born there and maybe that's where my interest started.
 

radou

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I've just always been fascinated by the country, I love reading and learning about it. I'd really like to go there one day and figure it would be easier if I understand the language haha. My grandma was born there and maybe that's where my interest started.
That's nice, it's always a good motivation.

I never liked Russian, it sounds somehow cold. Although it sounds similar as my native language, we have a considerable amount of words in common.
 

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