How many foreign languages do you speak/read?

  • Thread starter tehno
  • Start date

How many foreign languages do you speak/read?

  • I speak no other language except my native language

    Votes: 18 25.0%
  • I speak/read one foreign language

    Votes: 23 31.9%
  • I speak/read two foreign languages

    Votes: 17 23.6%
  • I speak/read three or more foreign languages

    Votes: 17 23.6%

  • Total voters
    72
2
0
My native language is Chinese and I speak English. Can understand some Japanese and Korean as well.
 
1,062
6
Vodka, Chess, what more could you ask for?

My Russian instructor told us last semester about a tradition at his university: When he was in college all men were required to take a military class, and during the final for this class everyone would pitch in and buy a bunch of bottles of vodka and put them under the military instructor's desk, and if there was enough vodka the instructor would go easy on grading the final :rofl: However, a few years after he left the tradition ended, and I think he said military class is no longer mandatory for men anymore.
 
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I speak fluent Australian English. G'day Mate. However I'm learning German as much as I can before I leave for Germany in 16 days. I find as I keep learning reading German becomes easier, but speaking I'm unsure of and constructing a good sentence is quite daunting. I watch TV shows in German to see if i can improve my listening skills. I am usually picking words and never getting a full sentence. My ability to speak and understand German is quite worrying since I have 16days before my 11month exchange there.

Therefore I'm going to say I can only really speak one language.
 
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360
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okay am I the only one for three? Proofs how old I am. In the dark ages of the educational system in the Netherlands, it was mandatory to study three foreign languages (German, French, English) with the philosophy that a small country has a lot of foreign neighbours. German and French are not a problem, but English..
Congrats.
But I see Pool results votes say 6 members (~20%) have already voted for '3 or more foreign languages' option!That's quite fantastic if I may say.
 
469
2
English is native language, can read/write/speak competent French.
 
343
1
English English and Korean.
 

BobG

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
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I speak fluent Australian English. G'day Mate. However I'm learning German as much as I can before I leave for Germany in 16 days. I find as I keep learning reading German becomes easier, but speaking I'm unsure of and constructing a good sentence is quite daunting. I watch TV shows in German to see if i can improve my listening skills. I am usually picking words and never getting a full sentence. My ability to speak and understand German is quite worrying since I have 16days before my 11month exchange there.

Therefore I'm going to say I can only really speak one language.
I sympathize completely. If you have to translate back to your native language, you're lost - you're always listening too slow to keep up. I think you probably have to be able to think in a foreign language if you hope to keep up - something I've never been able to do with short trips.

I imagine the getting around will be pretty exhausting for a little while. It's hard when you have to actually think about every 'normally' trivial step of anything you do. And then there's always that deer in the headlights look when you ask for a stamp and the clerk rattles off every option of stamp you can choose from. :rofl: It's a little overwhelming for a while.
 

turbo

Gold Member
3,028
45
I could probably get back up to speed in both French and German in relatively short order, if necessary. My native tongue is American English, and I grew up in a French-Canadian family (though I was not encouraged to speak French because my family wanted me to be more integrated with the English-speakers in my schools). I took a couple of semesters of German in college and was invited to the the department-head's annual party (beer, sausages, cheeses, etc), as a rookie, so I must have been doing OK....
 
3,761
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My native language is Dutch but i am fluent in English and French. I am quite good in Italian and i understand some German.

marlon
 

J77

1,070
1
I'm currently learning Dutch and I can get by in France with my highschool French :smile:
 
Mandarin is my native language, I can also speak a few dialects i.e cantonese and hokien.
 
I'm fluent in two languages...American English and British English (brilliant!). :biggrin:

I learned Spanish in college, but haven't used it in so long, I'd be hard-pressed to construct a single sentence anymore. I used to be pretty good at understanding spoken Spanish (having been immersed in it by association with a Spanish-speaking friend and all her Spanish-speaking family and acquaintances), but was never very good at speaking it.

I used to be able to read Latin too, but that's not very useful for anything other than knowing the origin of medical/anatomical terms.
Really so if I said say,whay aye lass, divn ya no nothing aboot how we speak arund here like? It's like we use tha proper words withuwt the proper dialects. If tha likes to speak jordie that's greet like. Propar English not like them suthern poofs speak liyk all lad de da liyk. Real propar talk like what I speak divn tha no.

Believe me if you spoke to some people in some locations you'd need a phrase book :smile:
 
3,761
8
I'm currently learning Dutch and I can get by in France with my highschool French :smile:
Je leert dus Nederlands, straf. Ik hoor immers dat dit niet direct de gemakkelijkste taal is om te leren.

Groetjes

marlon
 

J77

1,070
1
Je leert dus Nederlands, straf. Ik hoor immers dat dit niet direct de gemakkelijkste taal is om te leren.

Groetjes

marlon
Definitely not, especially when you use complex sentences like that!!! :wink:

I'm more at the level of:

Ik leer Nederlands te spreken.

You know - concentrating on putting the second verb to the end :biggrin:
 
3,761
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I'm more at the level of:

Ik leer Nederlands te spreken.
The "te" is not supposed to be there :shy:
Ik leer Nederlands spreken or Ik leer OM Nederlands TE spreken.


You know - concentrating on putting the second verb to the end :biggrin:
:rofl:
yeah, that is very important.

marlon
 
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Right, nasi goreng, in Holland, with a Heineken beer, by the "afhaal Chinees", translated, "the pickup Chinese".
How more Dutch can you get! :rofl:
So Dutch is indeed multi cultural. Heineken beer BTW is the most Dutch beer around. Freddy Heineken is the godfather who built the imperium.

Nasi Goreng is "Dutch", not Chinese but Dutch as in the colonial history. nasi goreng it is the national dish of Indonesia. The relationship between the two countries stopped shortly after WW-II but the Dutch culture is still influenced by that colonial past. Nasi goreng is just kidnapped by the Chinese
 
48
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Native language is English; however, I also speak German fairly well, though I'm a little rusty.
 
17
0
My native language is Spanish. I speak/read English, and read French and Portuguese.
 

Kurdt

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Je leert dus Nederlands, straf. Ik hoor immers dat dit niet direct de gemakkelijkste taal is om te leren.

Groetjes

marlon
Ahh Dutch. When will you stop pretending its a real language and speak Hochdeutsch? :wink: :tongue:

*Runs and hides*
 
4,453
57
Hochdeutsch? Das redet man nur in die Schweiz. :approve:

Grüß Gott :tongue:
 
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Kurdt

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brewnog

Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,701
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Really so if I said say,whay aye lass, divn ya no nothing aboot how we speak arund here like? It's like we use tha proper words withuwt the proper dialects. If tha likes to speak jordie that's greet like. Propar English not like them suthern poofs speak liyk all lad de da liyk. Real propar talk like what I speak divn tha no.

Believe me if you spoke to some people in some locations you'd need a phrase book :smile:
I was with a geordie in Cambridge a few years ago, trying to give directions to an American tourist. The geordie was genuinely trying to help, but the American thought the Brit was taking the piss. A scouser turned up after a while and joined in, that really confused the poor yank! I think another American came to her aid in the end...

Geordie is number 3 in my top ten list of global sexy accents.
 

Kurdt

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Geordie is number 3 in my top ten list of global sexy accents.
:rofl: Trust me its awful, and I was born on the banks of the Tyne.
 
I was with a geordie in Cambridge a few years ago, trying to give directions to an American tourist. The geordie was genuinely trying to help, but the American thought the Brit was taking the piss. A scouser turned up after a while and joined in, that really confused the poor yank! I think another American came to her aid in the end...

Geordie is number 3 in my top ten list of global sexy accents.
:rofl:
Ay ay like what he's sayin is that you wann go down dere past the boook shop and then ed right up to the traffic lights kay? Sound as a pound mate.Well Aye man that's what I said? Enter the Glaswegian: Perfect comedy sketch would be a procession of dialects trying to explain it while the tourist got more and more bemused, ending up walking off no more enlightened than before.:smile:
 
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J77

1,070
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The "te" is not supposed to be there :shy:
Damn - I knew that - compared to English you have quite concise sentence structures, hoor :wink:

As far as the Northern talk above - the other day my gf was translating a poem written in your Northern tongue - when I say translating, I had to do a bit of it - she comes from the Sarf coast :biggrin:
 

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