How many of C8H8's electrons has it gained/lost?

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In summary: You can use this to determine the number of electrons/protons present in the sample and the corresponding charge in Coulombs. In summary, the formula for styrofoam is C8H8 and a .25g styrofoam peanut contains a certain number of electrons and protons when it carries no excess charges. To find this number, you can use Avogadro's number to convert grams to molecules and then use the atomic number to determine the number of protons. Each elementary charge is equal to 1.602 × 10–19 Coulombs, so you can use this to find the amount of + and - charge in the sample.
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mono_ten
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Homework Statement


Assume the formula for styrofoam (a polymer containing carbon and hydrogen) is C8H8. In a .25g styrofoam peanut, how many electrons and protons are present if it carries no excess charges? How many Coulumb's of + and - charge does this stand for? How many of the peanut's electrons has been gained/lost if the peanut has an excess charge of +0.10 C?


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


Well, if this is a typical chemistry problem, in the beginning... I would convert grams to molecules using Avogadro's number.
Not sure how to find the number of protons and electrons after that though. Doesn't it have to do with the atomic number?
After that, I'm not exactly sure how to find Coulumb's of the + and - charges.
 
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  • #2
mono_ten said:

The Attempt at a Solution


Well, if this is a typical chemistry problem, in the beginning... I would convert grams to molecules using Avogadro's number.

Good start.

Not sure how to find the number of protons and electrons after that though. Doesn't it have to do with the atomic number?

The number of protons in a single atom of a given element is equal to the atomic number. If the sample contains no excess charges, you should be able to find the number of electrons based on the number of protons.

After that, I'm not exactly sure how to find Coulumb's of the + and - charges.

An elementary charge (the charge of one proton (+) or electron (-)) is equal to 1.602 × 10–19 Coulombs.
 
  • #3


I would approach this problem by first identifying the number of atoms present in a .25g styrofoam peanut. Using the molar mass of C8H8, which is 104 g/mol, we can calculate that there are approximately 0.0024 moles of C8H8 in a .25g sample.

Next, I would use the periodic table to determine the number of electrons and protons in each atom of C8H8. Carbon has 6 protons and 6 electrons, while hydrogen has 1 proton and 1 electron. This means that in a .25g styrofoam peanut, there are approximately 0.0024 moles of carbon and 0.0024 moles of hydrogen, which translates to 1.44 x 10^22 carbon atoms and 2.88 x 10^22 hydrogen atoms.

Assuming the styrofoam peanut carries no excess charges, the number of electrons and protons would be equal. This means that there are 1.44 x 10^22 protons and 1.44 x 10^22 electrons in the peanut.

To find the amount of charge, we can use the equation Q = n x e, where Q is the charge in Coulombs, n is the number of electrons, and e is the elementary charge (1.602 x 10^-19 C). Plugging in the numbers, we get:

Q = (1.44 x 10^22)(1.602 x 10^-19) = 2.306 x 10^3 C

This means that there are 2.306 x 10^3 Coulombs of both positive and negative charge in the peanut.

Finally, if the peanut has an excess charge of +0.10 C, we can calculate the number of electrons gained/lost by using the same equation and solving for n:

n = Q/e = (0.10)/(1.602 x 10^-19) = 6.24 x 10^17 electrons

Therefore, the peanut has gained 6.24 x 10^17 electrons to have an excess charge of +0.10 C.
 

Related to How many of C8H8's electrons has it gained/lost?

1. How do you determine the number of electrons gained or lost by C8H8?

The number of electrons gained or lost by C8H8 can be determined by looking at its atomic structure. Carbon (C) has 6 electrons and Hydrogen (H) has 1 electron. Since C8H8 has 8 carbon atoms and 8 hydrogen atoms, the total number of electrons present is (6 x 8) + (1 x 8) = 56. If C8H8 is ionized, it will either gain or lose electrons to achieve a stable electron configuration.

2. What is the difference between gaining and losing electrons for C8H8?

Gaining and losing electrons are two ways for C8H8 to achieve a stable electron configuration. Gaining electrons means that C8H8 has more electrons than its neutral state, which results in a negative charge. Losing electrons means that C8H8 has fewer electrons than its neutral state, resulting in a positive charge.

3. How does C8H8 gain or lose electrons?

C8H8 can gain or lose electrons through chemical reactions. For example, it can gain electrons by accepting an electron from another atom or molecule, or it can lose electrons by donating an electron to another atom or molecule. These reactions occur due to differences in electronegativity between atoms, which determines their tendency to gain or lose electrons.

4. What factors determine the number of electrons gained or lost by C8H8?

The number of electrons gained or lost by C8H8 depends on the element it is reacting with and the type of chemical reaction taking place. For example, if C8H8 reacts with an element that has a higher electronegativity, it is more likely to lose electrons. Similarly, if C8H8 undergoes an oxidation reaction, it will lose electrons, while in a reduction reaction, it will gain electrons.

5. How does the gain or loss of electrons affect the properties of C8H8?

The gain or loss of electrons can significantly affect the properties of C8H8. For example, if C8H8 gains electrons and becomes negatively charged, it will be more stable and less reactive. On the other hand, if C8H8 loses electrons and becomes positively charged, it will be more reactive and unstable. This change in reactivity can also affect the chemical and physical properties of C8H8, such as its melting and boiling points, solubility, and acidity/basicity.

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