How to prevent being blocked when I use VPN?

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  • #1
yungman
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I use Norton protection. They offer VPN. I try to use it. But I was blocked by a site after I use the VPN. I had to turn VPN off to get to the site.

Why? and what can I do to resolve this and still use VPN?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
the vpn changes your tcpip address to one of a large list of addresses that they own. if the site has blocked that new address then you get blocked.
 
  • #3
yungman said:
Why? and what can I do to resolve this and still use VPN?
Because many spammers, hackers and other people with malicious intent use VPNs.

Or to look at it another way: "I wore a balaclava when I walked into a bank. They refused to serve me. I had to take the balaclava off before they served me. Why? And what can I do to get served while wearing a balaclava?"
 
  • #4
So this is common?:frown:
 
  • #5
pbuk said:
I wore a balaclava when I walked into a bank.
The pastry?
 
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  • #6
You mean a biali?
 
  • #7
yungman said:
So this is common?:frown:
Yes, it is not uncommon.

Some organizations are vigilant about this and will attempt to make contact and report the IP addresses associated with malicious activity back to the owners of the address space (e.g. via email to abuse@ownerorg.com). As the registered POC for a class B netblock, I would receive those emails from time to time. My hat is off to the folks generating those notices. Generally speaking, they provided source IPs, time stamps, log files and a general characterization of the attacks.

Other organizations will simply chuck the IP address (or the owner ASN) on some flavor of IP blacklist and consider the job done. My organization fell into that camp. We had a good number of blacklisted ASNs along with a few blacklisted IP ranges. From time to time, I would need to update whitelists to make exceptions within blacklisted ranges. [Customers get upset when they cannot visit our web sites or send us email].

[An ASN (Autonomous System Number) is a number associated with an organization that connects to the BGP routing backbone for the public Internet. As an ordinary customer of an ISP, you would not have an assigned ASN. Your ISP would probably have an ASN. Your VPN provider would have a different ASN.]

I was on the routing and switching side of things. Our primary goal was to blacklist IP ranges from which huge attack volumes were emanating. The security guys had trouble keeping their firewalls up under the resulting load. So we took care of the bulk of the attack volume for them. We used blackhole routes and an RPF check -- that sort of thing is easy for a router but hard for a firewall.

As I said, I wore a routing hat. Our security guys certainly had the ability to subscribe to an IP block service. But since I was not directly involved, I have no good idea about how widely deployed such services are. For instance, the Imperva WAF (Web Access Filter) documents their capability. We ran a WAF, among other components, but I do not think we subscribed to an IP block list.

Getting yourself off of an IP blacklist can be a time consuming and thankless task. The hardest part is finding someone who cares enough to try to help. Then you have to pray that they can navigate their way to someone who has the ability to help. The level of individual and organizational competence that you encounter can sometimes be mind boggling. Often our security guys would need to skip all that and handle it from our end, switching to a different egress IP (we ran Cisco WCCP and transparent proxies for outbound traffic) or getting us router guys to use traffic engineering to a different egress point of presence entirely.

Some target web sites (mostly military) are opt-in. You have to register your IP in order to gain access. This can be troublesome when your egress IP can dynamicly change due to the use of VPN, outbound transparent proxy or an ISP that does not provide their customers with long term stable IP addresses. [My company's egress IPs were short term stable (days or weeks) but not long term stable (months or years)]
 
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  • #8
Vanadium 50 said:
The pastry?
balaclava, not baklava. :-)
And definitely not a bearaclava:
1691786075062.png
 
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  • #9
jbriggs444 said:
Getting yourself off of an IP blacklist can be a time consuming and thankless task.
And unlikely to work in this case, as the VPN address is usually dynamic, so thousands will need to be unblocked, and some of those are likely used by bad actors.
 
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  • #10
And FWIW, when I see a bad actor, I drop the entire ASIN now, not just the IP block. And things are much quieter.
 
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Related to How to prevent being blocked when I use VPN?

1. How can I prevent being blocked when using a VPN?

One way to prevent being blocked when using a VPN is to choose a reputable VPN provider that offers a large number of servers in various locations. This will help you avoid being detected as a VPN user by websites and services.

2. Is there a way to avoid being blocked by websites while using a VPN?

Avoiding being blocked by websites while using a VPN can be achieved by using dedicated IP addresses provided by your VPN provider. Dedicated IPs are less likely to be flagged as VPN traffic, reducing the chances of being blocked.

3. Can changing VPN servers help prevent being blocked?

Yes, changing VPN servers can help prevent being blocked. If a particular server is being detected and blocked by a website or service, switching to a different server location can help you bypass the block.

4. Are there any settings I can adjust on my VPN to prevent being blocked?

Some VPN providers offer features like obfuscated servers or stealth modes that can help disguise VPN traffic and prevent being blocked. Check if your VPN provider offers these options and enable them if available.

5. What should I do if I am still being blocked while using a VPN?

If you are still being blocked while using a VPN, try contacting your VPN provider for assistance. They may be able to provide guidance on how to avoid being detected or offer alternative solutions to prevent being blocked.

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