I have just realized that I never saved my college thermodynamics

In summary, a text that covers adiabatic processes and theory, equation derivations and problems would be a good choice for a college thermodynamics textbook.
  • #1
imsmooth
152
13
I have just realized that I never saved my college thermodynamics textbook. Any recommendations for a good one that includes theory, equation derivations and problems? I would like it to cover all topics including adiabatic systems.

Thanks.
 
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  • #2


Hopefully your new text will tell you that 'adiabatic' refers to the process, not the system.

At the level which adiabatic processes are introduced they are usually covered in a general physics text, such as Sears and Zemansky or Resnick and Halliday
You would need to try an engineering text such as that by Joel for a purely thermodynamics text.
 
  • #3
  • #4


Studiot said:
Hopefully your new text will tell you that 'adiabatic' refers to the process, not the system.

At the level which adiabatic processes are introduced they are usually covered in a general physics text, such as Sears and Zemansky or Resnick and Halliday
You would need to try an engineering text such as that by Joel for a purely thermodynamics text.

I do have the general physics text by Resnick. I've reread that chapter. I wanted something with more detail. Is Joel's text the one used for college thermodynamics courses?
 
  • #5


Well Engineering Thermodynamics by Rayner Joel is a well respected first text for (mech) engineers who will go on to build steam and jet engines, refrigeration, heating and ventilating plant and so on. There is much discussion of adiabatic, polytropic and other processes in relatively simple terms, though still useful enough to use steam tables or build something.

A good modern physics degree level text is Basic Thermodynamics by Carrington from Oxford University Press. This introduces Gibbs formulations and the beginnings of Statmech following a good grounding in classical thermo.
 
  • #6


You might also try Callen, "Thermodynamics and an Introduction to Thermostatistics." It's meant as a text for physics majors back when physics majors studied classical thermodynamics separately from stat. mech. That being said, I find this text to be very useful for and accessible to non-physicists.
 

What happened to my college thermodynamics work?

It appears that you never saved your college thermodynamics work, which means it is most likely lost.

Can I retrieve my lost college thermodynamics work?

Unfortunately, if you never saved your work, it is unlikely that you can retrieve it. It is important to save your work regularly to avoid this situation.

How will this impact my grade in the course?

Not saving your work may result in a lower grade for that assignment or overall in the course. It is important to communicate with your professor and try to make up the work if possible.

Is there any way to prevent this from happening again?

Yes, you can prevent this from happening again by regularly saving your work and backing it up on a separate device or platform. You can also use automatic saving features in some programs.

Will my professor accept my excuse for not having the work?

It ultimately depends on your professor's policies and understanding. It is best to communicate with them and explain the situation and see if there is any way to make up the work.

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