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If McCain-Palin are elected what is the reality of the chance of an AA president?

  1. Sep 11, 2008 #1

    GCT

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    I placed this thread here rather then the politics forum because I wanted the answers of a more diverse group of people i.e. not just the politically savvy. I'm not intending it to become flagrant. Hopefully it won't , however , I imagine that some of the moderators believe this may be the case anyway which would subsequently warrant the relocation of this thread...

    How many of you believe that if McCain and Palin are elected it would mean that African Americans have virtually zero chance of obtaining the presidency in the future? McCain is a second hand grade politician in the sense that he is approaching the average mortality age of the US and Palin is not even entry level in terms of qualifications ; Obama is fresh , he is good with Europe , and has displayed very decent qualifications for the job of Presidency.

    I'm very curious about the pick here with Palin because McCain has set himself up for a black and white outcome. If they win I would imagine that this would disintegrate the hopes of the African Americans ; who would be a better African American candidate than Obama and who would be worse than McCain - Palin?

    My guess is that the pick of Palin is in consideration of the next election - there may be a futuristic scheme here. My speculation is that she was picked to ( although I mentioned another in my post in the politics forum ) to candy coat a victory by an African American - superficialize the event so that it would not lead to historic changes. But note all of the people flocking to Palin anyways ... this is very worrisome. Even if Obama wins , the chances of another African American president in the future seems slim to me.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 11, 2008 #2
    the fact that Obama is a candidate is proof enough that there can be a black president. If McCain gets elected it will be because people want McCain to be president. I can't see anyone thinking that if the first black candidate from one of the two major parties doesn't win it means a black man never will. I'd think most people would think, getting closer. We'll get it next time.`
     
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  4. Sep 11, 2008 #3

    GCT

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    ...With all due respect your statements have no worth whatosever , there have been AA candidates just none of them are qualified as Obama and the hope of an AA president is at its greatest , if you don't understand about the importance of this issue then don't even comment.
     
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  5. Sep 11, 2008 #4
    I sure hope no one will be voting for Obama simply due to him being half black. On the same note, I hope no one is voting for McCain on the grounds that he is white!
     
  6. Sep 11, 2008 #5
    and next time the hope of an AA president will be at its greatest. Every time we've had a black candidate the hope of a black president was at its greatest. You think that if Obama doesn't win everyone will just give up?
     
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  7. Sep 11, 2008 #6
    as far as insinuating other people's opinions, isn't that exactly what you are doing in your original post? (the answer to that is: Yes.BTW)
     
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  8. Sep 11, 2008 #7

    BobG

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    That's the same logic many Clinton supporters had during the primaries (with many going on to form groups such as PUMA).

    Using that same logic, if McCain-Palin don't win, does that mean a woman can never be Vice President (it would be the second time a woman VP lost)? Or does McCain-Palin winning prove that the highest a woman can aspire to is Vice President, supporting the white guy that's obviously a better fit to be President.

    I think you're really stretching here.
     
  9. Sep 11, 2008 #8

    GCT

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    As I mentioned in my original post , what we have here is a very decently qualified AA candidate Obama who happens to have most of the AA votes and a second hand grade - in the sense that he's incredibly old - McCain with a not even entry level qualified Palin. Obama has been way above the standards of previous AA candidates and the other two represent the vice versa example. Are we going to ever have a AA as qualified and popular as Obama and are we ever going to have a nobody ex-beauty pagent without qualifications as candidates?

    My point was that we seem to have a black and white situation here.

    Edit : By " black and white " I'm not referencing race. i.e. This election is definitive.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2008
  10. Sep 11, 2008 #9

    BobG

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    David Paterson and Deval Patrick come to mind, right off the top of my head. Harold Ford could have been a possibility if not for losing in Tennessee's 2006 Senate election.

    Heck, Paterson could fill another void. We've never had a blind President before.

    Admittedly, there's more women in a decent position to run for President than blacks.
     
  11. Sep 11, 2008 #10
    I take your point, GCT, but think you are underestimating Black people. After being enslaved, robbed, lynched, and raped by Anglos for most of the past 400 years, they're not gonna suddenly slap themselves on the head and say, "Damn, Whitey don't want to share!"

    More to the point is whether there will ever again be a Democratic president. If Democrats can't elect this guy, who can they elect? Many Blacks are open to a third party.
     
  12. Sep 11, 2008 #11

    GCT

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    So you don't believe that this election is going to be definitive? AAs are flocking to the polls for this guy , a lot of the caucasians are headed the other way. So it does seem that race is an issue , btw not everyone votes with the issues in mind. AAs have been here ever since along with the British , except that a lot of the British have relocated to Britain since then so many of the caucasians in the US don't even have a British heritage here. A lot of the caucasian voters here haven't been here as long as AAs have .... thus many AA sense that something is amiss ....

    I agree with you on the fact that there haven't been many qualified AAs. However it's also about the voice of the people.
     
  13. Sep 11, 2008 #12

    D H

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    The US Presidency is a place for affirmative action.

    GCT, you are acting as if the only issue here is race. Race is inconsequential. There are many reasons people chose to vote against Obama / for McCain. You claim Obama is qualified and McCain is second rate, as if that were a given. Many, many people would claim that it is exactly the other way around. For starters, Obama is but a freshman senator.

    Then there's political ideology. Some people like McCain's views a lot more than they like Oboma's, and even more dislike Obama's views a lot more than the dislike McCain's. Should these people throw these real concerns out the window just because of Obama's skin color?
     
  14. Sep 11, 2008 #13

    russ_watters

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    You have a pretty opinionated stance for a thread-starter who claims he wants input. If you didn't want discussion, why did you start the thread?

    The fact of the matter is that Obama has only been in the national spotlight for 8 years and has has only been holding a national office for 3.5 years. So nevermind that there are other african americans in public office (real ones, even - not just ones who chose that identity like Obama did), but there could be ones you never heard of who could be running for President in 8 or 12 years. How 'bout the governors of New York or Mass? How 'bout Condi Rice?

    In any case, much of what you said in the OP is opinion stated as fact. Yes, Obama is a pretty good candidate - certainly stronger than Gore or Kerry. But so is McCain a good candidate. McCain has been in the national spotlight for a long time and has had a pretty consistently high approval rating. And while he may have lost the nomination bid to Bush 8 years ago, that doesn't mean he wasn't a strong candidate - quite the contrary, he was a stronger candidate than Bush for the general election because he is a moderate. Early in the race (before he started losing to Bush) he was, in fact, the strongest of all the candidates in the national polls.

    And while Obama is good, he's not an exceptional candidate. He's got a lot of big negatives. Some of his major problems:
    -He's black by choice, not birth (he's mixed-race and chose his one identy over the other). And he's displayed a heavy resentment/prejudice toward the other identity.
    -He's very liberal. That means he can't possibly get a lot of crossover vote in the general election.
    -He's very inexperienced.
    -He is widely regarded - even by many people who support him - as being more talk than substance. His liberal use of the "present" vote is good evidence of indecisiveness and lack of conviction.

    I think we're more likely to get a black elected President when we get one who doesn't run as an African American but instead runs as an American.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2008
  15. Sep 11, 2008 #14

    Evo

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    Russ I have never disagreed with you because you always argue rationally and calmly, but I have to question you on this one. Take a moment and look at Obama, and tell me what people's reactions would be if he claimed to be white. I believe he has discussed this dilema with race identification before.

    Do you really believe that Obama could run this Presidential campaign as a white man and people would agree he was white?

    Most "blacks" in this country are part white, there are very few that aren't mixed. Should we reclassify all mixed blacks as white?
     
  16. Sep 11, 2008 #15
    Actually, culturally he is white. He acts like a white. And in reality he had no choice since he was raised by his mother's family who are white. That is why a lot of blacks at first felt uncomfortable with him. He is not culturally black. And he obviously can't hate whites as you imply since then he would hate himself.

    Now as far as running for office, I agree with Evo that he has no choice but to take a black identity since that is what everyone expects. However, he isn't black in spite of his color. He is white.
     
  17. Sep 11, 2008 #16
    black but lives like a white? lol. oh man, if I wasn't already in trouble for making fun of someone.
     
  18. Sep 11, 2008 #17

    Evo

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    I work with a lot of people that are considered black because of their appearance, but they are no different from me (white). They are called black because of their appearance. Who's fault is that?
     
  19. Sep 11, 2008 #18
    Evo,

    If I may butt in. In America at least you are the race others consider you to be. Several members of my family have been Black and White depending on where they lived and when. During the segregation days in the south, I had a friend who was darker than Senator Obama, but who managed to convince people she was White. She enrolled in a Whites only school and dated a White guy without any difficulty.
     
  20. Sep 11, 2008 #19

    Evo

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    I'm not going to say you aren't telling the truth, but that would be a rare exception and more likely the people in charge decided to bend the rules than believe that she was white. Obama isn't that fair skinned, and his hair and features definitely show his black heritage.

    I have also worked with people from India that were darker than any black person I have seen, except for one Nigerian I met that was of pure black heritage. Having up to that time only met American blacks, it was rather shocking. Call me naive, but I had no idea, not even from tv, that the difference was that great.

    It's my understanding that there is a social difference in India between the fairer and darker skinned.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2008
  21. Sep 11, 2008 #20

    GCT

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    Really , what's the problem with anyone taking up certain personalities and preferences? I'm guessing that having the predilections of a " white " person is perceived by some " black " people to be the key to living successfully especially when they believe that the other option of being " black " is to take up ganster antics and living in financial destitution. It's really nonsense to attribute lifestyles and personalities to someone who is " black " or someone who is " white " ... despite the fact that " blacks " are taking up this trend more than " whites ".
     
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