Infinite Mass and Finite Tension over a pulley

In summary, the conversation discusses the tension on a rope suspending two masses of infinite size over a pulley. The question asks how the tension can remain at 1000 N despite the increasing mass, and the answer is given as 1000 N. However, it is unclear where this value comes from and if there is any additional information given in the problem.
  • #1
enantiomerrem
2
0

Homework Statement



Two masses hang across a massless, frictionless pulley. As the masses become infinitely large, the tension becomes:



Homework Equations



F=ma



The Attempt at a Solution



Can someone please help me understand how two masses suspended over a pulley can increase in mass infinitely while the tension in the rope suspending them will not exceed 1000 N? The way I have viewed it is that F=ma and as m increases so will force despite the fact that gravity is a constant acceleration. Thanks for any help provided.
 
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  • #2
It looks like you haven't given us the whole problem.

Where does 1000 N come from ?
 
  • #3
Right, so it is actually multiple choice:

A.) O N
B.) 500 N
C.) 1000 N
D.) Infinite

The back of my book says the anser is 1000 N, but I do not understand how this is possible. Thanks again for the help.
 
  • #4
Is there any more information given in the problem, such as the maximum tension at which the rope is rated?
 
  • #5
What about infinite ?
 

Related to Infinite Mass and Finite Tension over a pulley

What is meant by "Infinite Mass and Finite Tension over a pulley"?

Infinite mass and finite tension over a pulley refers to a situation where one side of a pulley system has a mass that is so large it can be considered infinite, while the other side has a finite amount of tension. This creates an unbalanced force on the pulley, causing it to accelerate.

How does this concept relate to Newton's Second Law of Motion?

According to Newton's Second Law of Motion, the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. In the case of infinite mass and finite tension over a pulley, the mass on one side is so large that it essentially cancels out the tension on the other side, resulting in a large net force and therefore acceleration.

What are some real-life examples of infinite mass and finite tension over a pulley?

One example is a crane lifting a heavy load. The weight of the load on one side of the pulley is so large that it can be considered infinite, while the tension on the other side is finite. Another example is a person pulling a rope attached to a large boulder. The mass of the boulder can be considered infinite compared to the tension applied by the person.

How does friction play a role in this concept?

Infinite mass and finite tension over a pulley assumes that there is no friction present in the system. In reality, friction will always be present and will affect the acceleration and overall behavior of the pulley system. This concept is often used in idealized physics problems to simplify calculations, but in real-world situations, friction must be taken into account.

What are the limitations of using infinite mass and finite tension over a pulley in calculations?

This concept only applies to idealized situations where there is no friction. In real-world scenarios, friction and other external factors will affect the behavior of the pulley system. Additionally, the mass on one side cannot truly be infinite, so this concept is not applicable in all situations.

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