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Integral (with respect to d(z/σ))

  1. Nov 4, 2011 #1
    Hello all,

    I have uploaded a .gif of the integral. The limits are just values, as I know what d,h, and σ1 are. d and h are the lower and upper limits defined for the probability distribution function and σ1 is the standard deviation.

    I have not seen this type of integral before, I am not sure how I can evaluate this numerically as I need to do this with respect to d(z/σ))?

    This is on a research paper I am currently reviewing, Can anyone help?

    Thanks.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 4, 2011 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    why not substitute [itex]u=z/\sigma_1[/itex] ?
     
  4. Nov 4, 2011 #3
    Would that help me to integrate this between the numerical limits of d/σ1 and h/σ1? Sorry still confused, could you explain further. Thanks.
     
  5. Nov 4, 2011 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    If that's what you want to do.
    Of course you'd have to substitute for the limits as well.

    if you integrate from z=a to z=b but you make the the substitution in the integrand that u=f(z) then what happens to your limits?

    But - if u = z/s, what is dz/du ? what is d(z/s)/du ? Put du = ... for each. Compare.
     
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