Integration of a vector with respect to a vector.

In summary, the process of integration of a vector with respect to another vector involves using the dot product and the limit as the number of subintervals approaches infinity. This is related to the definite integral and can be used to evaluate the electric field dot product. A recommended book for beginners in vector calculus may be helpful in understanding this concept further.
  • #1
Ceeerson
10
0
will someone give me an explanation of the process of integration of a vector with respect to another vector. the reason i ask is because in the topic of electricity i am discussing the electric flux of a point charge inside a solid surface. I know that the dot product is related, and i can even see how the limit as the number of subintervals approaches infinity, then Ʃ running from k = 1 to n of the vector f(x*)times the vector(Δx*) times (cosθ ) is equal to the definite integral, it would just take forever to count and and i wouldn't know how to evaluate the integral without knowing the antiderivates, my main concern is integrating from a to b of the electric field dot da, and while on the topic, will someone please explain how area can be a vector please, i know that you can pull out all the constants, but and even the antiderivative of 1/r^2 but i just don't understand the integration and what happens. if that makes sense.

sincerely confused
 
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  • #2
You should take a course in vector calculus. What you are asking is usually covered over several weeks of such a course.
 
  • #3
oh ok well i won't have that option for a while so is there a recommended book for beginners over vector calc, it doesn't have to be dumbed down, just interpret-able any insight would be greatly appreciated!
 

Related to Integration of a vector with respect to a vector.

What is the definition of "Integration of a vector with respect to a vector"?

The integration of a vector with respect to a vector is a mathematical operation that involves finding the area under a vector field curve. It is a generalization of the traditional one-dimensional integration to higher dimensions.

What is the purpose of integrating a vector with respect to a vector?

The integration of a vector with respect to a vector is essential for calculating quantities such as work, flow, and flux in vector fields. It also helps in solving differential equations and analyzing vector velocity and acceleration fields.

What are the steps involved in integrating a vector with respect to a vector?

The steps involved in integrating a vector with respect to a vector include choosing a parameterization for the vector field curve, finding the limits of integration, and then calculating the definite or indefinite integral using appropriate integration techniques.

What is the difference between integrating a vector with respect to a scalar and with respect to a vector?

Integrating a vector with respect to a scalar results in a scalar quantity, while integrating a vector with respect to a vector results in a vector quantity. Additionally, the limits of integration for a vector with respect to a vector will be vectors, whereas for a scalar, they will be constants or functions of a single variable.

What are some real-life applications of integrating a vector with respect to a vector?

The integration of a vector with respect to a vector has various applications in physics, engineering, and economics. For example, it is used to calculate the work done by a force field, the flow of a fluid, and the net force acting on a body. It is also used in multivariable calculus, which is essential in many fields, including computer science, economics, and statistics.

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