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Is overall bill reduced by using fan regulators

  1. May 1, 2015 #1

    CRT

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    actually i searched a lot regarding this question but didnt find exact answer anywhere.some say electricity bill reduces some vice versa.do all extra voltage is dissipated as heat? in the regulator,or current drawn remains same or only partially dissipated as heat.Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 1, 2015 #2

    berkeman

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    Could you please provide some more context to your question? What's a fan regulator? Where is it being used?
     
  4. May 1, 2015 #3

    CRT

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    http://maxelectrical.tradeindia.com/fan-regulator-1133953.html a fan regulator is a device put in series with fan to alter its speed.it can provide different value of resistance through a rotatory switch numbered 1 ,2,3,4,5.At position 5 the speed of fan is max.at 1 its min.as resistance of regulator is max.at that position.http://maxelectrical.tradeindia.com/fan-regulator-1133953.html
     
  5. May 1, 2015 #4

    CRT

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    sorry the url was not uploaded.its here-
    maxelectrical.tradeindia.com/fan-regulator-1133953.html
     
  6. May 1, 2015 #5

    CRT

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    it has been designed for India 230v/50hz.it gets hotter if we increse its resistance through rotary switch(to position4,3,2,1),but the fan slows down.as it gets reduced voltage now.sorry if i am still not able to elaborate.
     
  7. May 1, 2015 #6

    CRT

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  8. May 1, 2015 #7

    CRT

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  9. May 2, 2015 #8

    meBigGuy

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    The current drawn from the mains will reduce as you slow the fan with a series resistor, so the power bill will reduce. You are paying some for the heat generated by the resistor, but overall you save money since the watt-hours that you are billed for is current* 230V* time.
     
  10. May 2, 2015 #9

    CRT

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    thanks sir.but i wanted to know one more thing.my inverter was producing humming sound one day,the moment i slowed down my fan the sound was silent.was it due to reduced current drawn or a little bit improved power factor.
    is variation in current in ac circuit as well as dc circuit upon introduction of new resistance is same way?
     
  11. May 2, 2015 #10

    NascentOxygen

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    If the electronics box contains a transformer (or a smoothing inductor) this can produce a humming sound if the current in its wires is great enough. At lower currents, this hum may not be noticeable. Some hums can be mechanical vibrations due to something being lose or flexible, perhaps some turns on an inductor coil are not firmly glued down, or the core of a transformer may not be tightly held together.

    If these loose areas don't vibrate much they may not contact anything to make noise, but when they vibrate a little bit more they hit something solid and cause produce sound. The more energy in a coil, the more energetic they will vibrate.
     
  12. May 2, 2015 #11

    CRT

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    thanks for your precious time for answering sir.
     
  13. May 2, 2015 #12

    NascentOxygen

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  14. May 2, 2015 #13

    Averagesupernova

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    The device in post #6 is most likely an inductor with variable taps. Last ones I installed for ceiling fans used this approach and looked very similar to what was posted.
     
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