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Is there any hope for our psycho cat?

  1. Dec 19, 2011 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    We have a male cat that was kept in a room for the first six months of his life. This happened before we got him. By the time we did get him he was already extremely aggressive, but we hoped that with time he would calm down. Well, he's not. He is intent on running off any other cat, which is a problem since we have 3 females. He is far stronger than the rest and pretty much just terrorizes any cat in sight. In fact, the reason I moved Little Tyke down to my office was a real fear that Jack might kill her before she could fend for herself. We were lucky he never seriously injured her.

    It is sad because he is extremely affectionate with people. He could be a great pet. But I don't trust him.

    From what I have read, his personality suggests that he was damaged by his early confinement. The only option I've seen is the Feliway synthetic hormone, which is available in collar form now. We're going to try it but I don't have a lot of hope. It is going to take a big change in his behavior if we are to have peace in the house.

    Any other suggestions? If this doesn't work we're going to have to get rid of him. We've never been forced to consider this option before.
     
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  3. Dec 19, 2011 #2

    Lisa!

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    A male and 3 females?
    That makes any male crazy!:biggrin:
     
  4. Dec 19, 2011 #3
    Is he neutered?
     
  5. Dec 19, 2011 #4

    Ivan Seeking

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    Actually, you would think he'd have at least one favorite. But all he does is terrorize them with fierce attacks on sight.
     
  6. Dec 19, 2011 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    Oh yes, that's always the first requirement.

    I keep wondering if something grew back! But you would think he would tolerate the females better in any case.
     
  7. Dec 19, 2011 #6

    Office_Shredder

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    They're probably hitting on him and he's trying to cover up his condition with the minimal embarrassment possible. Poor fella.

    I've only known one cat with, for lack of a better term, emotional instability. 12 years later and he wasn't any better I'm sorry to say
     
  8. Dec 19, 2011 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    I took this shot with the intent of emphasizing the point, but he even looks psycho, doesn't he? Honestly, he has the same look in his eyes as many of those gang members I've mentioned. It's not like he looks and thinks, what's that? It is more like he's always sizing things up and deciding whether to attack or not.

    http://img830.imageshack.us/img830/318/jacklc.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  9. Dec 19, 2011 #8

    Drakkith

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    Perhaps a good kick across the room whenever he gets too rowdy will help. Or a good backhanding.
     
  10. Dec 19, 2011 #9
    The fact he's affectionate with people is greatly in his favor. I think your best bet is to find him a home where he'll be the one and only cat.
     
  11. Dec 19, 2011 #10
    I, and my then partner, once tried to take care of a cat who was either psycho or maltreated. If the beast is anything like that, you'll never find out where the problem arose, and it's probably too late anyway.

    We ended up giving the beast away to a horse-riding school. Lots of space to dwell by itself, other cats, and nobody to harm. It'll have a shorter life span, probably, but I suggest you do the same.

    Btw.

    Guess it was a joke, but in my experience cats are not dogs. They respond poorly to punishment except for marking the borders of territory. When I had cats I preferred to pet them or toss them around. They usually land on their feet and walk off offended, it seemed to work.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2011
  12. Dec 19, 2011 #11
    maybe put him in a carrier so that the other cats can approach safely, give them a chance to familiarize themselves without harm.
     
  13. Dec 19, 2011 #12

    Monique

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    Is your house big enough for all the cats? They should all have access to a separate room to reside in. A friend of mine also had a cat with similar issues, when she moved to a bigger house the cats started to get along a lot better.

    My parents once owned a psycho cat that would attack anyone who would dare to tell her what to do. If she was in the kitchen and I would tell her to go to the hallway she would enter full-attack mode and I had to jump on the furniture for safety. It was likely due to a brain tumor that was causing the impulsiveness, unfortunately.

    I don't think your cat has the same, it's likely a territorial issue.
     
  14. Dec 19, 2011 #13

    Evo

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    Aww, he's a pretty cat. Have you consulted a "cat whisperer"? They've got skunk whisperers.

    I hope the hormones work, you and tsu really go above and beyond caring for your anilmals.

    The answer may be to try to place him with a family where he will be the lone cat.
     
  15. Dec 19, 2011 #14

    AlephZero

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    Cat territories are as weird as cats. A friend of mine has a big house and garden, and a couple of cats. They get along fine together everywhere except in the kitchen, which is divided into goodness knows how many bits individual cat territory with invisible boundary lines between them, defended with teeth and claws. They even eat out of the same food bowl ... anywhere in the house except in the kitchen. Go figure.
     
  16. Dec 19, 2011 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    Two of the four, Little Tyke and Bun, now live in my office, which is a separate building. I had to intevene to prevent him [Jack] from taking over my office as well. But I seem to have won that battle. At the moment it is only poor Zoobie [our cat, not her namesake, Zooby] who lives in terror, though Zooby may live terror as well, but that's another issue.

    So yes, they have plenty of room.

    Yes, it seems to be.

    The vet. They recommended using the Feliway collar. You may remember that we tried the Feliway diffuser with Isaac to stop him from spraying, and it worked. He would lie by the diffuser and was as happy as could be. But I don't have a lot of hope for Jack because he didn't seem to be affected by the diffuser.

    :biggrin: At least now that we're down from 13 to 4, things are easier to manage. When we had the dogs, goats, sheep, horse, cows, rabbit... what else?... it was a lot of work and tremendously expensive.

    We call him Big Bad Jack. I should post a photo of his scratching post. Unlike anything I've ever seen in over 40 years of cat ownership, that post was virtually destroyed in no time. This is one seriously strong and tough cat. On the up side, we haven't seen another stray around here in three years. :biggrin: THAT is actually a good thing!

    Edit: You know, we've had a bear on the property lately... Jack might be able to take care of that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2011
  17. Dec 19, 2011 #16
    http://icanhascheezburger.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/funny-pictures-gif-cat-bear-viasp.gif [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  18. Dec 19, 2011 #17

    rhody

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    Can you feel the love, boo boo kitty !!!

    Rhody... :devil: :biggrin:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  19. Dec 19, 2011 #18
    That's too bad. Hopefully the hormone collar will work, but if not there's the hope of finding a caring family or person with no other cats.

    Can Jack freely roam outside and inside? Just curious. I don't know if that freedom would help in your situation, but we've had cats before and allowed them that freedom and never had any problems of the sort you're describing (just that they would get killed in traffic or whatever periodically).
     
  20. Dec 19, 2011 #19
    I do, but not from cats. At any rate you shouldn't let one pet terrorize another, and Jack needs to hit the road. Advertise him honestly as very affectionate to people but not to other cats, and he should be adopted soon. Alternately, you could build him his own 3 bedroom house and let him live alone.
     
  21. Dec 19, 2011 #20

    turbo

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    Ooh! A cat-house! That could be a popular attraction!
     
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