Is this sorta mechanical component ever made?

In summary, the conversation is discussing the concept of deriving a normal reaction from the stress in a body, without any external force or resulting net motion. The conversation delves into examples such as an explosion in a rigid container and the use of internal forces in a free body diagram. The conclusion is that such a phenomenon has not been achieved, as internal forces will always sum to zero externally on a continuous basis.
  • #1
dE_logics
742
0
When a force falls on a body, it gets a normal reaction.

Conventionally this normal reaction can be given by friction, spring compression, chemical reaction, motion etc...

Now...have we ever made such an arrangement that this normal reaction is derived from the stress on a body...nothing else...or at at least some amount of normal reaction is derived from the stress in the body.

Just for examples sake...suppose a bomb explodes in a rigid container...all the the shock wave will be absorbed or normal reaction will be given back to that shock wave from the container's reaction to the stress made by the shockwave...or the strength of the container will give the normal reaction. In this case there's no net motion but there's a normal reaction cause of the rigid container (considering a perfectly homogeneous explosion, i.e shockwave completely distributed in space evenly).

If the explosion would not have been homogeneous, there would have been a net displacement, same for any force applying in one direction

What I am asking here is...has any arrangement been made so as to derive this normal reaction from the stress in the body even though the force is in one direction and without giving the total arrangement a net motion (small amount of motion is ok).

If you don't get it pls respond.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I guess not.
 
  • #3
You seem to be implying some sort of reactionless propulsion or energy generation. If so, you are misinterpreting the free body diagram of the forces. Internal forces will not ever sum to anything but zero externally on a continuous basis.
 
  • #4
dE_logics said:
Conventionally this normal reaction can be given by friction, spring compression, chemical reaction, motion etc...

Now...have we ever made such an arrangement that this normal reaction is derived from the stress on a body...nothing else...or at at least some amount of normal reaction is derived from the stress in the body.
Emphasis Added

Spring compression is stress. When you place an object on a flat table the normal reaction is due to stress. This happens all the time.

However, if russ_watters is correct and you are asking about some sort of reactionless propulsion then you really misunderstand stress.
 
  • #5
russ_watters said:
You seem to be implying some sort of reactionless propulsion or energy generation. If so, you are misinterpreting the free body diagram of the forces. Internal forces will not ever sum to anything but zero externally on a continuous basis.

When you shoot a bullet the force is internal.
 
  • #6
DaleSpam said:
Emphasis Added

Spring compression is stress. When you place an object on a flat table the normal reaction is due to stress. This happens all the time.

However, if russ_watters is correct and you are asking about some sort of reactionless propulsion then you really misunderstand stress.

The reaction is to be derived from the internal stress of the body.
 
  • #7
Do you mean like in a bouncing ball?
 
  • #8
dE_logics said:
When you shoot a bullet the force is internal.

Yes. And the forces sum to zero in that case too (hence recoil).
 
  • #9
Integral said:
Do you mean like in a bouncing ball?

No...like an explosion in a contained rigid chamber...the reason why its shockwave did not pass though the chamber is cause the normal reaction was given by the chamber.
 
  • #10
So are you just asking if anyone has ever made an explosion in a rigid chamber? If so, the answer is yes.
 
  • #11
:smile: :smile: :smile: :smile:

No man!...I used that to explain my point.
 
  • #12
OK, why don't you try a different explanation. I don't think anyone understands your question. A free-body diagram might help more than words.
 
  • #13
Agreed. We're only guessing at your point - you are being very vague.
 
  • #14
I believe the OP is attempting a net-unidirectional force through some type of exotic internal manipulation(explosive or otherwise)
In other words, a forced displacement of the center-of-mass and, more so, in a continuing, net-unidirectional force outcome within a closed-system.

That's a hard call...
 

Related to Is this sorta mechanical component ever made?

1. Is this sorta mechanical component ever made?

The answer to this question depends on the specific mechanical component in question. Many mechanical components have been designed and manufactured, but there are always new and innovative designs being created. It is best to research and consult with experts in the field to determine if a specific mechanical component has been made before.

2. How do I know if a mechanical component is suitable for my project?

To determine if a mechanical component is suitable for your project, you should consider its size, material, and function. It is also important to ensure that the component can withstand the forces and conditions it will be exposed to in your project. Consulting with a mechanical engineer or other experts in the field can also help determine if a component is suitable for your specific project.

3. Can I design and create my own mechanical component?

Yes, it is possible to design and create your own mechanical component. However, it requires a strong understanding of mechanical engineering principles and access to specialized tools and materials. It is also important to thoroughly test and validate your design before using it in any project.

4. What materials are commonly used in mechanical components?

Some common materials used in mechanical components include metals such as steel, aluminum, and titanium, as well as plastics, composites, and ceramics. The specific material used depends on the function and requirements of the component. For example, a component that needs to be lightweight and strong may use aluminum, while a component that needs to withstand high temperatures may use a ceramic material.

5. Are there any safety considerations when working with mechanical components?

Yes, there are safety considerations when working with mechanical components. It is important to follow proper safety protocols and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when handling and assembling components. Also, it is crucial to thoroughly test and validate the components before using them in any project to ensure they can withstand the expected forces and conditions.

Similar threads

Replies
69
Views
3K
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
339
Replies
16
Views
1K
  • Mechanics
Replies
19
Views
2K
  • Quantum Interpretations and Foundations
11
Replies
376
Views
12K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
9
Views
3K
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
1K
Back
Top